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Maintaining physical and emotional health during prostate cancer treatment: A patient’s story

March 11, 2009

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Comments

harry mead
June 18, 2018

Since this article was written years ago how is this man doing today? And does anyone know his full name?

Kae F Moore
November 24, 2017

I need more recent results in late 2017.

Terry Morris
February 03, 2017

There is a lot of information in this article. It addresses many of my initial concerns – recently diagnosed with prostate cancer. Thank you for sharing.

Jesse DelaFuente
January 20, 2017

My insurance has denied my doctors request to treat my prostate cancer with proton beam therapy. What argument can be used to get it approved on appeal. They argue that it is an experimental treatment which they do not cover.

Johnny
June 22, 2017

I am in the same predicament, my insurance company won’t pay for the proton beam treatment.

Ray Taylor
August 20, 2016

I live here in Utah, I am interested in a simple PHI or 4K test only from a blood sample. I understand it has to be referred or approved by a doctor? Where or how can I do this? How much does it cost approximately? Thank you for your help.

Ankit
October 23, 2015

With respect to the stafey of eating foods from a microwave; the main issue relates to the containers used to heat the food in and not the microwave radiation, which cannot be absorbed into food as all it does is to cause water molecules to vibrate and heat. Some plastics, for instance, are more prone to the effect of “migration”. whereby some additives used in plastics are more likely to migrate to foods more than others. The main concern in the past has been in connection with plasticisers which are used to improve the flexibility of some packaging materials. As the tendency for plasticisers to migrate increases at higher temperatures, only those plastics specifically designed for oven use are suitable for cooking.To reduce any possible risk one should;* Use only microwave-safe utensils.* While some packaging films may be labelled ‘microwave-safe’ care should be taken to avoid direct contact with the food when using them to cover containers or to reheat dinners on plates.* As migration is more likely to occur into hot fatty foods, glass containers are a suitable choice for heating these products.As yet there are no standards for claims such as “microwave safe”; if you are in doubt as to the stafey of such materials contact the manufacturer or use a ceramic/glass alternative.Further, there are also many reports that indicate the loss of vitamins and certain goodness from foods that are microwaved, but the fact is that the nutritional value of food cooked in microwave is as nutritious as food prepared using conventional convection cooking methods. In fact as far as the loss of vitamins is concerned microwave cooking is preferable to boiling so as to minimise possible leaching of vitamins into the cooking water. So if anything, microwave cooking enhances mineral retention in vegetables. Further, the quality of protein, in foods cooked in a microwave is higher than those foods cooked conventionally, as far less oxidation occurs in meat cooked in a microwave. Similarly, reheating food quickly in a microwave retains more nutrients than holding food hot for long periods such as cooking and keeping food warm continually over a flame.If you would like to read some more information on the subject the following link that has been prepared in conjunction with the CSIRO, would be a good source.-

kemal coban
October 18, 2014

hey how are u today

spire electronic cigarette
October 13, 2014

It’s remarkable to go to see this web site and reading the views of all colleagues regarding this article, while I am also zealous of getting familiarity.

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