Controlling what - and how much - we eat

Harvard Health Letter

Because humans have evolved to crave fat, salt, and sugar, it is difficult to shift away from them and toward a healthier diet, but it is possible to learn to like vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain foods more. Eating a variety of vegetables at a single meal is a way to encourage greater intake. If you keep an open mind and try a variety of vegetables, you might find varieties that contain bitter compounds to which you are less sensitive. The genetic variations that affect reactions to bitter-tasting vegetables may also influence a person's liking of whole grains.  One strategy for making whole grains more appealing is simply to mix in some refined grains. You can sneak more whole grains into your diet by substituting half the flour in cookie, muffin, or bread recipes with whole-wheat flour, mixing wheat germ into meatballs, meatloaf, or burgers or adding barley, a whole grain that's mild in flavor, as a thickener in soups and stews.
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