Depression

Welcome to our Guide on Depression.

By answering a series of questions, you will learn about the different forms of depression and the significance of the symptoms you or a loved one may have.

While depression comes in many forms, two features will almost always be present -- change in mood and physical changes.

Change in mood: Depression always involves a noticeable change in mood. That can mean feeling low, blue, or sad, but sometimes depression appears as irritability or not being able to enjoy everyday activities.

Physical changes: People with mood disorders may also develop changes in appetite, sleep, or energy.

The purpose of this guide is to help you better understand what depression is. This guide is not designed or intended to make a diagnosis. But knowing more about the condition often makes it easier to talk with a doctor about the symptoms you are experiencing.

Click here to begin.

Death by suicide is the most dreaded consequence of depression. Fortunately it is a rare event.

The overwhelming majority of depressed individuals do NOT commit suicide.

Thinking about suicide is a form of suffering in its own right, so mental health providers pay attention to it. They often ask questions about it in people who have symptoms of depression.

Relieving suffering from depression should reduce the risk of suicide.

The best approach to helping a person who is thinking about suicide is to treat the underlying problem or problems. But the first order of business is to make sure you stay alive to get that treatment.

Are you currently having thoughts about suicide and do you think you might act on them?

Yes, I am having thoughts about suicide.

No, I am not having thoughts about suicide.

That's good. It's not at all unusual for people to think about suicide from time to time. But with depression there is always some risk that suicidal thoughts will become more intense, especially if you get more depressed. Getting help will reduce this risk.

Click here to find out more about the type of depression you might have.

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