Harvard Heart Letter

Clogged arteries in the gut?

Just like the arteries that supply blood to the heart, arteries in the intestines can become clogged with cholesterol-filled plaque. Known as intestinal angina, the condition is marked by pain that occurs about 30 minutes after eating and lasts one to two hours. This uncommon problem is more prevalent in women, particularly current or former smokers. People with intestinal angina often develop “food fear,” which causes them to lose substantial amounts of weight. Treatment involves restoring blood flow to the intestines, usually by threading a catheter through a vessel to the blockage and inserting a tiny mesh tube (stent) to prop open the artery. 
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