Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Taking osteoporosis drugs shouldn't prevent you from getting oral surgery

Some women are being turned down for oral surgery or other dental procedures because they are taking osteoporosis drugs, which pose the risk of a rare condition called osteonecrosis of the jaw. But experts say the overall risk of developing this condition is low, and in most cases the fact that a woman is taking an osteoporosis drug shouldn’t stop her from receiving oral surgery. (Locked) More »

Don't ignore vaginal dryness and pain

Vaginal dryness, irritation, and pain during intercourse affect 50% of women after menopause and are caused by declining estrogen levels in the body. A study showed that vaginal estrogen and moisturizers are equally effective in reducing symptoms in some women. But existing treatments often fall short of providing full relief. (Locked) More »

Problems with your pelvic floor? Blame your firstborn

While cesarean delivery may mean longer recovery time after your baby is born, it may make it less likely that someday you'll need to cross your legs when you cough or sneeze. A study in the Dec. 18, 2018, issue of JAMA found that women who delivered their first baby by cesarean had half the risk of developing stress urinary incontinence (which causes urine to leak when you cough or sneeze) or overactive bladder, compared with first-time moms who had a spontaneous vaginal birth. (Locked) More »

Avoid complications by treating chronic constipation early

 Image: © krisanapong detraphiphat/Getty Images Like gray hair and wrinkles, constipation is something you're more likely to experience as you age. "Constipation is a very common complaint; mild irregularity is probably even more prevalent," says Dr. Judy Nee, an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. "Women are more likely than men to be constipated." More than one in three adults ages 60 and older have experienced constipation symptoms, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Constipation is typically defined as having fewer than three bowel movements a week; having stool that is hard, dry, and difficult to pass; or feeling that you aren't able to void completely when you use the bathroom. (Locked) More »

Postmenopausal bleeding: Don’t worry — but do call your doctor

You've gone through menopause and you thought your periods were a thing of the past — but suddenly, you're bleeding again, more than a year after your last period. Should you be concerned? The good news according to an analysis published in JAMA Internal Medicine, is that most likely your bleeding is caused by a noncancerous condition, such as vaginal atrophy, uterine fibroids, or polyps. But the study also reinforces the idea that postmenopausal bleeding should always be checked out by your doctor to rule out endometrial cancer, a cancer of the uterine lining, says Dr. Ross Berkowitz, William H. Baker Professor of Gynecology at Harvard Medical School. (Locked) More »