Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Sexual and gender minorities face unique health risks

Sexual and gender minorities may have higher risks of certain health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and mental illnesses, including anxiety and depression. A new study also found that they may be at higher risk for dementia.  There are strategies that can mitigate this risk, including adopting health habits proven to promote heart health, such as a healthy diet, regular screening exams and frequent exercise. Experts also recommend addressing mental health problems quickly and finding a LGBT-friendly provider. More »

Winning the weight battle after menopause

Changes in hormone levels just before and during menopause may cause women to gain weight and to store more weight around their middle, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes can help, but they may not always be enough to make a difference. Some women may need to seek out assistance from a weight-loss professional. (Locked) More »

Dealing with high-density breasts

High breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer that is typically detected on a mammogram. The FDA is proposing that mammography facilities tell women if they have high density, but there are no definitive rules in place that tell doctors how to best manage these women to reduce risk. Some strategies you can use if you have high breast density are to have a conversation with your doctor about breast cancer risk and reducing alcohol use. (Locked) More »

Does your vagina really need a probiotic?

Many people are taking vaginal probiotics, which are promoted as a means to improve health. But experts say there is little scientific evidence that they work. While probiotic treatments could hold promise, the science isn’t quite there to back up current claims. People who do want to use a vaginal probiotic should be skeptical of claims and be aware that supplements are not regulated, so they may not actually contain promoted ingredients. (Locked) More »

How can I prevent recurrent UTIs?

Preventing frequent urinary tract infections can become more challenging as women age, but drinking lots of water and practicing good hygiene can help prevent them. (Locked) More »

Newer breast screening technology may spot more cancers

A new study shows that digital breast tomography, sometimes referred to as 3D mammography, is better at accurately finding cancers, including smaller cancers, and reduces the risk of false positive results compared with digital mammography. The advantages of the technology were particularly pronounced in women in their 40s. For this reason, younger women may want to consider using this screening method instead of traditional digital mammograms. (Locked) More »