Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

A new look at colon cancer screening

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths and the third most common cancer in men. Screening tests to help find and often remove polyps before they become cancer are recommended for men ages 50 to 75, yet many avoid them. To help highlight the urgency for regular colon cancer screenings, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has issued updated recommendations and described tests that might be a better option than an invasive colonoscopy, especially for lower-risk men. More »

Dry skin? Moisturizers can help

Effective moisturizers contain either a humectant—which attracts water into the top layer of the skin—or an occlusive, which keeps water from evaporating off the skin, or both.  Emollients make products easier to apply. (Locked) More »

Easy ways to build better bones

There are many ways to build bone mass and reduce fracture risks. Weight-bearing activities and strength training exert force on the bones, which stimulates them to become stronger. Consuming calcium helps make strong bones, and taking vitamin D aids calcium absorption. Medications called bisphosphonates can help to reduce fractures, but do have rare side effects. Lifestyle change can also protect bone health, such as quitting smoking, limiting alcohol intake, and removing fall hazards in the home. More »

Should I worry about a heart murmur?

Heart murmurs can occur when people are young and then return in older age. There are three main causes in adults: increased volume or speed of blood flowing through a normal heart, a stiff heart valve, or a leaky heart valve. Most do not lead to heart problems, but a change in the murmur’s intensity or the appearance of symptoms like shortness of breath, light-headedness, or chest pain would prompt a further medical evaluation. (Locked) More »

Talk to the animals

Animal-assistant therapy (AAT)—which involves regular interaction with animals like dogs, cats, and even horses—can have both immediate and long-lasting impacts on your emotional and mental health. AAT is used to treat depression, stress, and anxiety, and older men also can use it to combat the challenges of aging, such as dealing with the loss of a loved one or declining health. (Locked) More »

Why sitting may be hazardous to your health

Inactivity may be as powerful a risk factor for early death as smoking is. However, short bouts of exercise can diminish the adverse effects of inactivity, and 60 to 75 minutes of moderate exercise can erase the health effects of eight hours of sitting. Inactivity may be as powerful a risk factor for early death as smoking is. However, short bouts of exercise can diminish the adverse effects of inactivity, and 60 to 75 minutes of moderate exercise can erase the health effects of eight hours of sitting. (Locked) More »

Join the healthy heart trend

A recent report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey found the rates for heart disease among people ages 60 and older have fallen from 19.5% to 14.9% in the past decade. Three factors may explain the drop in heart disease rates, according to the survey researchers: better diet, increased physical activity, and more use of drug therapy like aspirin therapy and statins. More »