Women's Health

Women have many unique health concerns — menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control, menopause — and that's just the beginning. A number of health issues affect only women and others are more common in women. What's more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.

We tend to think of breast cancer and osteoporosis as women's health diseases, but they also occur in men. Heart disease in a serious concern to both men and women, but risk factors and approaches to prevention are different. Women may also have specific concerns about aging, caregiving, emotional health issues, and skin care.

Women's Health Articles

Will removing your fallopian tubes reduce your risk of ovarian cancer?

Some cases of ovarian cancer originate in the fallopian tubes. Some experts recommend that women who are undergoing pelvic surgery consider having their fallopian tubes removed, a strategy that may help prevent ovarian cancer. But there are potential risks of tube removal should be balanced against the potential benefits. A lack of information about the long-term risks of the procedure is one factor to consider. (Locked) More »

Study finds weak link between birth control and breast cancer

A new study shows that hormonal birth control could raise a woman’s risk of breast cancer, but only by a small amount. However, women over age 40 who use hormonal birth control may want to ask their doctors about whether they should shift to nonhormonal contraception. (Locked) More »

Is your drinking becoming a problem?

Statistics show that drinking among older women is on the rise. Many women suffer from alcohol use disorder. Identifying and accepting it can lead to successful treatment. (Locked) More »

How false assumptions about weight may affect your health

Obesity can affect a woman’s health, even when they’re otherwise healthy. Feelings about weight may prompt some women to skip needed appointments or avoid preventive care. In addition, health care providers may be prone to weight bias, and that may result in women with obesity receiving substandard treatment. (Locked) More »

Study links gum disease to cancer in older women

A new study shows that women with periodontal disease may be at higher risk of cancer, but some experts say they’re skeptical because of study limitations. Even so, it’s important to protect gum health, because periodontal disease has been linked to other health conditions. (Locked) More »

Test may someday help predict diabetes risk

A new test called lipoprotein insulin resistance may more accurately predict whether a woman will develop type 2 diabetes than existing methods of assessing risk, such as family history of the disease, body mass index, and blood glucose levels. The test can pick up on signs of insulin resistance, which can lead to diabetes, before a woman has an abnormal glucose test. (Locked) More »

Women’s stroke rate stubbornly steady

A recent study found that while the stroke rate among men has dropped in recent years, the risk for women has stayed the same. While men may be benefiting from prevention and treatment efforts for high blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes, women do not seem to be reaping the same benefits. This may reflect some risk factors specific to women that should be given additional attention. (Locked) More »

Don’t underestimate your heart risks

Two new surveys show that women and their physicians may not be taking women’s cardiovascular risks as seriously as they should be. Women are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from any other health condition, but both women and doctors appear to underestimate this risk. A proactive discussion with your doctor can help you protect your heart and your health. (Locked) More »