Vaccinations

Vaccinations Articles

Are there any new vaccines?

Thanks to an apprentice surgeon in the mid-18th century who found a way to prevent smallpox, we have vaccines to help protect us against disease. And scientists continue to look for new vaccines and new ways to deliver them. For example, some researchers are developing skin patches and inhaled aerosols to deliver vaccines, and genetically engineering plants to make vaccines. Work is also under way on vaccines that reduce the damage done by infections people already have, and vaccines against some non-infectious illnesses, such as certain cancers and high blood pressure. (Locked) More »

Bracing for flu season: Steps to protect yourself right now

Flu shots are not guaranteed to keep someone from getting influenza. Sometimes the shot is not a good match for the viruses that cause epidemics. Still, older adults should get the trivalent or quadrivalent flu shot, especially people who have diabetes or heart, lung, or kidney disease, or who take medication that suppresses the immune system. Other anti-flu precautions include washing hands often (with soap and warm water or hand sanitizer if soap is unavailable), and covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing. (Locked) More »

Baby boomers: Don’t forget hepatitis C screenings

Despite a 2012 recommendation that all baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C, an analysis of government health surveys suggests that only about 13% of baby boomers had been tested for hepatitis C by 2015, up just one percentage point from 2013. More »

Can the flu increase my heart attack risk?

A new study found that a person’s risk of heart attack is six times more likely to occur within the week following an influenza diagnosis. However, getting a flu vaccination can reduce the risk of illness and death from heart disease. (Locked) More »

What’s new with the shingles vaccine

Shingrix, a new vaccine to protect against the shingles virus, reduces the risk of shingles by an average of 97% among adults ages 50 and older. This is almost double the protection of the previous shingles vaccine, Zostavax, which reduces the risk of shingles by an average of 51%, but becomes less effective as people age. (Locked) More »