Stress

Stress is bumper-to-bumper traffic when you're in a hurry. It's a worrisome illness, an argument with your partner, a job turning sour. It's the need to care for an ailing parent and a pile of unpaid bills.

Stress has many faces, and creeps into our lives from many directions. No matter what causes it, stress puts the body and the mind on edge. It floods the body with stress hormones. The heart pounds. Muscles tense. Breathing quickens. The stomach churns.

The body's response to stress was honed in our prehistory. Collectively called the "fight-or-flight" response, it has helped humans survive threats like animal attacks, fires, floods, and conflict with other humans. Today, obvious dangers like those aren't the main things that trigger the stress response. Any situation you perceive as threatening, or which requires you to adjust to a change, can set it off. And that can spell trouble.

Chronic stress can lead to high blood pressure and heart disease. It can dampen the immune system, increasing susceptibility to colds and other common infections. It can contribute to asthma, digestive disorders, cancer, and other health problems. New research even supports the notion that high levels of stress somehow speed up the aging process.

Though stress is inevitable, you can help control your body's response to it. Exercise, meditation, invoking the relaxation response, and mindfulness are great stress busters.

Stress Articles

The exercise stress test: What to expect

Once done as part of a routine check-up, exercise stress tests are now done mostly to diagnose possible heart disease in people with symptoms such as chest pain or breathlessness. They can also help determine how hard a person should exercise. During the test, a person walks on a treadmill at progressively faster speeds while an electrocardiogram (ECG) measures the heart rate and the heart’s electrical activity. Findings from the test may suggest a need for further testing or treatment.  (Locked) More »

Is that mood change a sign of something more serious?

Mood-related symptoms can come and go in response to everyday stresses. If they occur for long periods, cause significant distress, or interfere with daily functioning, it’s an indication to seek help. Mood changes may be the result of a psychiatric disorder, a sleep disorder, a medication’s side effect, or changes in brain structures or chemical neurotransmitter systems. A significant mood change that lasts for more than a few weeks should be evaluated by a health care professional.   More »

How to avoid overload and burnout

It's important for women to slow down the pace of their day and take better care of themselves, even if they focus on one thing at a time-like going to bed earlier. (Locked) More »

What meditation can do for your mind, mood, and health

Meditation is an effective way to reduce stress, anxiety, pain, and depression. There are many different forms of meditation, including transcendental and mindfulness. Women are encouraged to experiment until they find the meditation form most effective for them.  More »

Breath meditation: A great way to relieve stress

Mindfulness-based meditation helps to control stress and preserve health. It combines rhythmic breathing and focused attention. It is a form of entry-level meditation that anyone can do. It brings general relaxation and, if practiced regularly, offers many health benefits, including a more accepting attitude toward life’s challenges. More »

Mini-stroke: What should you do?

The symptoms of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) often go away on their own, but they are a warning that a person is at greatly increased risk for a true stroke. It’s important for women to get to the hospital within three hours of when their symptoms start. More »

Emotional stress induced ischemia

Emotional stress causes a temporary slowdown in blood flow to the heart in seven of 10 people with heart disease. There’s a medical term for this: mental stress–induced myocardial ischemia. Emotional and mental stress work the same way as inadequate blood flow caused by physical stress and may be just as likely to trigger a heart attack. Learning to cope with stress is the best first option; some people may benefit from antidepressants or other drugs. (Locked) More »

Stress and your heart

Severe, trauma-related stress can lead to a condition called “broken heart syndrome.” The link between ongoing, everyday stress and heart disease may result from stress-related behaviors—such as eating an unhealthy diet, smoking, and drinking. More »

Skipping a beat — the surprise of heart palpitations

Does your heart unexpectedly start to race or pound, or feel like it keeps skipping beats? These sensations are called palpitations. For most people, heart palpitations are a once-in-a-blue-moon occurrence. Others have dozens a day, sometimes so strong that they feel like a heart attack. Most palpitations are caused by a harmless hiccup in the heart's rhythm. A few reflect a problem in the heart or elsewhere in the body. Doctors can be quick to attribute palpitations to anxiety, depression, or some other emotional or psychological problem. Although sometimes that's right, it's important to first rule out harmful heart rhythms and other physical causes. Different people experience heart palpitations in different ways. Palpitations can feel like the heart is fluttering, throbbing, flip-flopping, murmuring, or pounding. They can also feel like the heart skips a beat. Some people feel palpitations as a pounding in the chest or neck; others feel them as a general sense of unease. More »