Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

Does exercising at night affect sleep?

New research suggests that people can exercise in the evening without it affecting their sleep as long as they avoid vigorous physical activity for at least one hour before bedtime. More »

Losing steam? Avoid these energy zappers

Lifestyle habits may be to blame for some daily fatigue. For example, eating too much processed food can increase inflammation, which impairs the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—the molecule that delivers energy to cells throughout the body. Getting too little sleep or being too stressed out all the time can increase levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which also reduces production of ATP. Eating a healthy diet, getting more sleep, and reducing stress can reduce fatigue. So can avoiding dehydration, exercising more, and staying socially connected. More »

Stay active, even with stiff ankles

Ankles typically stiffen over time for one reason or another, such as osteoarthritis, ankle impingement, old injuries, inflammatory disease, tendinitis, or foot problems such as flat feet. Treatment depends on the cause of ankle stiffness. Treating underlying conditions may ease symptoms. Icing and rest can also help tendinitis or inflammation. In cases of misalignment, bone spurs, or significant joint arthritis, surgery may be the best option. Often, however, ankle stiffness can be treated simply with physical therapy, weight control, daily exercise, and stretching. (Locked) More »

Stretch your exercise plan beyond weights and cardio

Tight muscles can create health risks, making people more prone to chronic pain, balance problems, and even falls. Daily or every other day stretches can help reduce these risks and are a crucial part of a comprehensive exercise program. Stretches don’t need to be intensive to work. Even simple movements that take muscles and joints through a full range of natural motion are helpful. (Locked) More »

The lowdown on squats

One of the best exercises to counter the effects of prolonged sitting is the simple squat, which can be done with just body weight, dumbbells, or against a wall. Squats are a great exercise because they activate so many bones and joints at once, such as the hips, knees, feet, and ankles, as well as muscles like the quads, gluteals, hip flexors, hamstrings, and calves. Squats also can help build and maintain a stronger lower body, which makes movement easier and allows people to stay more active. (Locked) More »

Easy ways to adapt exercises when you have arthritis

As helpful as exercise is for osteoarthritic joints, it can also lead to injury. One can avoid the risks by adapting exercise so that it does not place excessive force on the joints. That may mean ditching high-impact classes that include a lot of jumping and opting for low-impact classes or pool aerobics. Other exercise classes that help include tai chi and yoga. At the gym, a stationary bicycle or an elliptical machine is good for low-impact aerobic conditioning. When using dumbbells or weight machines, it helps to use lighter weights with more repetitions. (Locked) More »