Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

Stretching may improve blood vessel health

Doing easy leg stretches may improve flow throughout the body by making the arteries more flexible and able to dilate. Passive stretching could become a new nondrug treatment for improving vascular health. More »

Home gym advantage

COVID-19 forced most gyms and fitness centers to close and to require more restrictions once they reopen. Home-based exercises are ideal for maintaining fitness during the pandemic. Investing in a stability half-ball and resistance bands can help replicate most machine or hand weight exercises. (Locked) More »

The mental side of cardiac rehab

Recovery from a heart attack, heart failure, angioplasty, or heart surgery often involves cardiac rehabilitation. While it’s normal to have some anxiety and stress after a heart-related issue, dealing with these issues and treating even more significant problems such as depression can affect people’s recovery success and increase their risk of future problems. (Locked) More »

Brain health and walking speed often decline together

Scientists found that slower gait speed and cognitive decline may be related, as both may be affected by similar factors, such as atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and abnormal deposits of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain. More »

Can I outwalk breast cancer?

Walking an average of an hour a day may reduce a woman’s risk of breast cancer. The American Cancer Society recommends getting at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise each week. (Locked) More »

Exergaming: Fitness and fun in front of your TV?

Exergaming, or active-play video games, may encourage adults (including those with heart disease) to be more active. They can offer a convenient, light- to moderate-intensity workout and feature an array of different simulated sports and recreational activities, including bowling, golf, tennis, dancing, and martial arts. But they shouldn’t replace traditional outdoor exercise or recreational activity. (Locked) More »

Step up your walking game

Most people typically get around 3,000 to 4,000 steps per day doing things such as household chores, going to the mailbox, or grocery shopping. But people who walk 8,000 steps per day (about 4 miles in total) may live longer than those who walk just 4,000 steps per day—and walking speed doesn’t seem to matter. People who walk 12,000 steps per day may live even longer than those who take 8,000 steps. But the added benefit was small, and walking even more may not make a difference. More »

Turn your exercise into summer fun

Moving more is a worthy goal, but many people dread exercise. That’s often the case because people assume it means a trip to the gym or a stint on a treadmill. But exercise can take many forms, from gardening to dancing or an evening stroll. The key is to find enjoyable activities; people are often more likely to stick with these over time. (Locked) More »