Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

Babying your back may delay healing

Back pain often comes on without warning and will usually get better on its own, even when imaging shows changes such as arthritis and disc degeneration. The best way to treat back pain is to avoid prolonged rest and stay active instead. Aggressive interventions may actually make the condition worse. More »

Americans aren’t meeting exercise goals

A report published online June 28, 2018, by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics suggested that most Americans are not meeting the guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities. More »

How to get a move on

Women who have been sedentary for years can benefit from an exercise program. But getting started may be a challenge. Often it is a fear of not fitting in or the idea that they are not athletic that prevents them from taking the first step. But charting out a reasonable plan ahead of time can help overcome those barriers. (Locked) More »

Rethinking the 30-minute workout

Federal guidelines advocate 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week for optimal health, which breaks down to 30 minutes, five days a week. People who have trouble finding the time for exercise can break down their 30-minute workouts into smaller segments throughout the day. Also, doing less than the required 150 weekly minutes can still offer significant health benefits compared with not doing any exercise. (Locked) More »

Guard your heart during the dog days of summer

Heat, humidity, and haze can put stress on the cardiovascular system. People who have or are at risk for heart disease should drink plenty of water and be careful when exercising outdoors during hot, humid weather. Those who sweat a great deal might consider consuming sports drinks, which contain electrolytes to replenish the minerals they lose when sweating. People who take blood pressure medications (especially diuretics) should ask their doctor about possibly adjusting their dosage on days when they are outside in the heat. (Locked) More »

How to sneak in more daily exercise

An estimated 67% of older adults report sitting for more than eight hours per day, and only 28% to 34% of adults ages 65 to 74 are physically active. U.S. guidelines suggest that adults get 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week, which breaks down to 30 minutes on five days a week. While this can be a challenge for many older men, it’s possible to reach this weekly number by incorporating quick and simple body movements throughout the day. (Locked) More »

A personalized approach to preventing Alzheimer’s disease

While there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, ongoing research suggests that people can lower their risk by adopting certain diet, exercise, and lifestyle behaviors. These include doing adequate amounts of weekly aerobic exercise, following the MIND diet, not smoking, and getting sufficient sleep. (Locked) More »