Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

Putting heart attack, stroke triggers in perspective

Certain activities and situations can trigger heart attacks in those at risk, but researchers are showing how these risks need to be placed in the proper context. The impact of triggers depends largely on cardiovascular health. They are far more likely to cause a heart attack, stroke, or cardiac arrest in a person with heart disease than in someone with a healthy heart and arteries. Physical condition also matters. Exercise or physical exertion is much more likely to trigger a heart attack in someone who leads a sedentary life than in someone who exercises regularly. It's almost impossible to avoid cardiovascular triggers, but you can reduce or inactivate their effects. (Locked) More »

Staying active despite osteoporosis

Whether it comes after a broken bone or a low bone density reading, a diagnosis of osteoporosis spurs you to rethink your relationship with exercise. An exercise program will not only make your bones more resilient, but also help you avoid falls and fractures and lower your risk for chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes — all of which are important in preserving your mobility and independence.  (Locked) More »

Walking: Your steps to health

The benefits of walking extend to many aspects of health and fitness. Incorporating walking into one's daily routine is an excellent starting point. More »

Leisure time exercise

Like his father and grandfather before him, the typical American man of the 21st century works for his living. In most cases, though, he works with his mind, not his body. It wasn't always that way. As recently as the 19th century, 30% of all the energy used in the American workplace was provided by human muscle power; today, the percentage is minuscule. In most ways, the transition from an agricultural economy to an industrial society to today's information age has been a great boon. But something has also been lost. Technology has freed men from physical labor both at work and at home. In addition, unprecedented efficiency, productivity, and affluence have produced shorter workdays, more vacation time, and earlier retirement. It all adds up to more free time for most men. More »