Physical Activity

Physical Activity Articles

7 simple ways for women to get active

Current guidelines recommend that adults get 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, but women can decide how they get that exercise. It is best to space out activities—for example, exercising for 30 minutes, five days a week. And, breaking up activities into 10-minute sessions offers as much of a health benefit as exercising for a full half-hour at a time. Many everyday activities count as exercise, including gardening, playing with the grandchildren, and even making love. (Locked) More »

The secrets of longevity

Staying active and connected can extend optimal physical and mental health in the 90s. Pursuing leisure activities and not smoking are also key. (Locked) More »

Putting more brain in the bank

Mental and physical activity seem to be equally important in keeping the brain active to ward off cognitive decline in older age. Exercise seems to affect the brain directly, increasing the number of synapses and enhancing the action of neurotransmitters, the chemicals that make brain cell–to–brain cell communication possible. It also increases the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a "brain juice" protein that promotes the production of new brain cells and the survival of existing ones. (Locked) More »

Putting heart attack, stroke triggers in perspective

Certain activities and situations can trigger heart attacks in those at risk, but researchers are showing how these risks need to be placed in the proper context. The impact of triggers depends largely on cardiovascular health. They are far more likely to cause a heart attack, stroke, or cardiac arrest in a person with heart disease than in someone with a healthy heart and arteries. Physical condition also matters. Exercise or physical exertion is much more likely to trigger a heart attack in someone who leads a sedentary life than in someone who exercises regularly. It's almost impossible to avoid cardiovascular triggers, but you can reduce or inactivate their effects. (Locked) More »

Staying active despite osteoporosis

Whether it comes after a broken bone or a low bone density reading, a diagnosis of osteoporosis spurs you to rethink your relationship with exercise. An exercise program will not only make your bones more resilient, but also help you avoid falls and fractures and lower your risk for chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes — all of which are important in preserving your mobility and independence.  (Locked) More »