Pain

Everyone experiences pain at some time. It might be the result of an injury, operation, or pushing your body too hard. Headache, infection, arthritis, and other health problems cause pain. Unchecked, pain can rob you of the ability to sleep, work, and enjoy life. It can also lead to depression and anxiety.

We've come a long way from the days of "grin and bear it," or "no pain, no gain." Pain begets pain, so it's important to stop it early. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to pain relief. Standard medications can be a good option for many pain sufferers, but a wide range of effective nondrug therapies are also available.

Pain Articles

Blocked arteries may be causing that leg pain when you walk

Daily walking is essential to treat leg pain that starts when you walk for a while but subsides when you rest, a condition called intermittent claudication caused by blockages that impede blood flow in the legs. Supervised exercise is helpful to many, but may not be covered by health insurance. Home-based walking works well if the person is able to sustain daily motivation. Medication can also help to improve walking distance, but daily walking should always be part of treatment. (Locked) More »

Could your joint pain be bursitis?

Joint pain is a common complaint in aging, but the cause isn’t always arthritis. Sometimes the culprit is bursitis. It occurs when fluid-filled sacs near the joints called bursae become inflamed, most commonly at the shoulders, hips, knees, elbows, or even the buttocks. Treatment may include using ice, resting the area and relieving pressure on it, using anti-inflammatory medicines for a short period, exercising and stretching the muscles that support the joints, or getting a shot of corticosteroid into the inflamed bursa. (Locked) More »

How to sleep better with chronic pain

To manage trouble sleeping due to chronic pain, start by adopting healthy sleep habits. Relaxation techniques such as guided meditation and guided imagery may be helpful for falling asleep. When pain wakes you up, avoid mentally stimulating activities. Adopting a strict sleep schedule, even when awakened during the night or awakening too early, can help keep the sleep schedule intact. Long-term use of sleep medications may do more harm than good. (Locked) More »

Pain relief: Taking NSAIDs safely

NSAIDs can help relieve pain and reduce inflammation from arthritis and other chronic aches and pains. However, you want to use the lowest dose for the shortest time. More »

Ask the doctor: Glucosamine and chondroitin benefits?

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) offer more relief than glucosamine and chondroitin for people suffering from osteoarthritis of the hip and knee. However, NSAIDs also have adverse effects that glucosamine and chondroitin do not have. (Locked) More »

Daily moves to prevent low back pain

Exercise prevents flare-ups of low back pain caused by muscle strain or spasm. Exercise daily to make back muscles more strong and flexible. When back pain is due to a problem in the spine, do not start new exercise without talking to a doctor. Severe back pain that gets worse or prevents you from ever finding a comfortable position for sitting or sleeping warrants immediate medical attention. Yoga shows promise for helping low back pain. Before starting yoga, clear it with your doctor and try it for a limited period to see if it works. More »

Pain beyond the prostate

Chronic pelvic pain is difficult to treat. If pain is related to a prostate infection, antibiotics can cure the condition. Most cases of chronic pelvic pain in men do not trace back to infections, and doctors have few proven treatments to offer. After exhausting the standard options, consider alternative therapies if they ease the discomfort and pain and do no harm. (Locked) More »

Top 5 ways to reduce crippling hand pain

The most common causes of hand pain include osteoarthritis, nerve conditions, and tendinitis. There are a number of ways to help manage the pain, retain hand function, and avoid surgery. Doctors recommend a splint to stabilize the position of the fingers, thumb, or wrist. An injection of a corticosteroid into a joint can also reduce hand pain, as can a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Applying heat can loosen hand stiffness. Applying cold is effective for hand pain that results from activity. Exercises and stretches can help reduce pain and stress on the hand joints. More »