Pain

Everyone experiences pain at some time. It might be the result of an injury, operation, or pushing your body too hard. Headache, infection, arthritis, and other health problems cause pain. Unchecked, pain can rob you of the ability to sleep, work, and enjoy life. It can also lead to depression and anxiety.

We've come a long way from the days of "grin and bear it," or "no pain, no gain." Pain begets pain, so it's important to stop it early. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to pain relief. Standard medications can be a good option for many pain sufferers, but a wide range of effective nondrug therapies are also available.

Pain Articles

Different types of headache need different treatments

The most common types of headaches in older adults include tension, migraine, and sinus headaches. Knowing which type of headache one has will indicate which medications to use first. Sometimes a headache is a sign of a serious medical problem, such as a stroke or high blood pressure. People should seek immediate care for headaches that interfere with daily activities, and headaches that come on suddenly like a blow to the head or cause confusion, eye or ear pain, fever, convulsions, or weakness. (Locked) More »

Insoles for arthritic knees

A recent research review published in The Journal of the American Medical Association has found shoe inserts do little-if anything-to relieve knee arthritis pain. (Locked) More »

Don't look to insoles to solve your knee pain

Wedge insoles are placed in the shoe to prop up the outside of your foot. They are meant to reduce the load on the inner knee joint. However, there is evidence the insoles do little to relieve knee arthritis pain. (Locked) More »

Hot or cold for back pain?

Heat or cold can both relieve discomfort from lower back pain. Most experts recommend cold to relieve swelling and heat for spasm or stiffness. (Locked) More »

Quick fixes for your aching feet

Colder weather often brings foot problems to light because people again wear closed shoes instead of sandals. Common problems include fallen arches, pain in the back of the heel known as Achilles tendinitis, pinched nerves in the foot, ingrown toenails, and pain underneath the heel known as plantar fasciitis. When these conditions occur, it is best to get to a doctor as soon as possible, to keep it from getting worse. In many cases, there are quick fixes for each problem. (Locked) More »

10 tips to prevent injuries when you exercise

To avoid the sprains, strains, and other injuries that can occur with exercise, make sure your workout program is right for you. Warm up before each session and cool down afterward. Never exercise to the point of pain. (Locked) More »

Arthritic knees: Exercise can help, but don't overdo it

Exercise to strengthen an arthritic knee reduces pain and stiffness and improves daily functioning. It is important to match the right type and amount of exercise to the arthritis condition. Those with arthritis behind the kneecap should avoid deep knee bends and other moves that require large amounts of flexing the joint. Severe knee arthritis limits the amount of exercise possible. It can help to work with a physical therapist to design an appropriate exercise program that strengthens the knee without causing excessive pain and swelling. (Locked) More »

Blocked arteries may be causing that leg pain when you walk

Daily walking is essential to treat leg pain that starts when you walk for a while but subsides when you rest, a condition called intermittent claudication caused by blockages that impede blood flow in the legs. Supervised exercise is helpful to many, but may not be covered by health insurance. Home-based walking works well if the person is able to sustain daily motivation. Medication can also help to improve walking distance, but daily walking should always be part of treatment. (Locked) More »

Could your joint pain be bursitis?

Joint pain is a common complaint in aging, but the cause isn’t always arthritis. Sometimes the culprit is bursitis. It occurs when fluid-filled sacs near the joints called bursae become inflamed, most commonly at the shoulders, hips, knees, elbows, or even the buttocks. Treatment may include using ice, resting the area and relieving pressure on it, using anti-inflammatory medicines for a short period, exercising and stretching the muscles that support the joints, or getting a shot of corticosteroid into the inflamed bursa. (Locked) More »

Pain relief: Taking NSAIDs safely

NSAIDs can help relieve pain and reduce inflammation from arthritis and other chronic aches and pains. However, you want to use the lowest dose for the shortest time. More »