Pain

Everyone experiences pain at some time. It might be the result of an injury, operation, or pushing your body too hard. Headache, infection, arthritis, and other health problems cause pain. Unchecked, pain can rob you of the ability to sleep, work, and enjoy life. It can also lead to depression and anxiety.

We've come a long way from the days of "grin and bear it," or "no pain, no gain." Pain begets pain, so it's important to stop it early. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to pain relief. Standard medications can be a good option for many pain sufferers, but a wide range of effective nondrug therapies are also available.

Pain Articles

Physical and mental fitness are essential for maintaining back health

Preventing occasional back pain from becoming a chronic problem requires both physical and mental fitness. It is important to stay physically active, strengthen the muscles supporting the back, practice good posture when sitting, and maintain flexibility. Healthy sleep and a positive, less stressed attitude helps people be less sensitized to back pain and less apt to fall into a cycle of increasing physical deconditioning and disability. More »

Pill-free way to reduce pain and improve balance and flexibility

Yoga is a series of postures and breathing techniques that include an element of awareness. It has many components that can help one cope with everything from chronic illness to sleep disorders. The poses help decrease muscular tension and build flexibility and strength. Weight-bearing postures can help build bone strength, and there are postures to improve balance. The mindfulness aspect of yoga helps with stress reduction, improves sleep, and helps one become more accepting of the body during the aging process. (Locked) More »

Staying active when it's hard to move

Experts recommend getting 30 minutes of exercise on most days of the week, but it can be hard for people with arthritis or other mobility-limiting conditions to get that exercise. A number of exercise techniques can help people with reduced mobility, including pedaling on recumbent bicycles, doing seated exercises with weights, and practicing chair yoga. (Locked) More »

Double trouble: Coping with arthritis and heart disease together

People with heart disease and arthritis face challenges with regard to exercise—which is important for both conditions—and medications. Swimming, recumbent biking, and walking are good choices for most people with heart disease and arthritis, who tend to be less active than people with either disease alone. Certain medications to ease arthritis pain, especially nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pain relievers, can interact dangerously with drugs for heart conditions. Avoiding certain drugs or taking them at different times may be needed. (Locked) More »

Effective exercises for osteoporosis

Women who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis or who’ve already suffered a bone fracture may worry about injuring themselves further if they exercise. In reality, exercise is essential for strengthening bones and preventing falls. The ideal program for osteoporosis combines weight-bearing, muscle-strengthening, flexibility, and balance exercises. (Locked) More »

Acetaminophen safety: Be cautious but not afraid

For the average healthy adult, the generally recommended maximum daily dose of acetaminophen is no more than 4,000 milligrams (mg) from all sources. But in some people, doses close to the 4,000 mg daily limit for adults could still be toxic to the liver. It's safest to take only what you need, and to not exceed 3,000 mg a day whenever possible, especially if you use acetaminophen often. More »

Total hip replacement and the older man: More options than you really need

Total hip replacements have become routine, but there are other options. One is hip resurfacing, which replaces damaged joint surfaces with new hardware but leaves more of the natural bone intact than in a total hip replacement. Surgeons can choose among different ways of implanting a new joint. One gaining popularity is anterior hip replacement, in which the surgeon installs the new joint through an incision in the front of the hip. These various options have advantages and disadvantages. For an older man who needs hip surgery, a standard joint implant surgery is reliable, has well-known risks, and could last for the rest of his life. (Locked) More »

Understanding cardiovascular pain

The chest pain that can result from heart disease (angina or a heart attack) can mimic the pain caused by heartburn or pericarditis, or inflammation of the tissues around the heart. Likewise, peripheral artery disease may be mistaken for arthritis of the knees, hip, or back. Understanding the underlying causes, symptoms, and duration of each of these conditions makes it easier to distinguish between them—and deal with the pain calmly and safely. (Locked) More »