Pain

Everyone experiences pain at some time. It might be the result of an injury, operation, or pushing your body too hard. Headache, infection, arthritis, and other health problems cause pain. Unchecked, pain can rob you of the ability to sleep, work, and enjoy life. It can also lead to depression and anxiety.

We've come a long way from the days of "grin and bear it," or "no pain, no gain." Pain begets pain, so it's important to stop it early. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to pain relief. Standard medications can be a good option for many pain sufferers, but a wide range of effective nondrug therapies are also available.

Pain Articles

Pelvic organ prolapse: You're not alone

About half of women over 50 have pelvic organ prolapse, which may cause discomfort, incontinence, or pain during sex. Specialists in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery can customize therapy to relieve your symptoms and accommodate lifestyle. (Locked) More »

Calluses and corns

Calluses and corns are thickenings of the outer layer of skin. They develop to protect skin from damage against prolonged rubbing, pressure, and other forms of irritation. Calluses and corns usually form on the hands or feet. They only need treatment by a doctor or other clinician only if they cause pain or other problems.  More »

Gout

Gout is a painful condition caused by too much uric acid in the blood and tissues. When the level of uric acid is too high, this substance can form tiny crystals that lodge in joints, causing joint pain. Uric acid crystals can also lodge in the kidneys, causing kidney stones. A related condition called pseudogout occurs when crystals of calcium accumulate in joints. Gout occurs for three main reasons: Gout runs in some families. Among younger individuals, it affects men far more often than women. This gap shrinks among older men and women. More »

Metastatic bone cancer

Some types of cancer begin in the bones. These true "bone cancers" include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing tumor, and others. Most cancers that affect the bones, though, begin in some other organ or tissue and spread (metastasize) to the bones. This is called metastatic bone cancer. After the lungs and liver, the skeleton is the most common destination for cancers that arise in other parts of the body. The growth of cancer cells in bones can cause pain or broken bones. Pain that occurs without physical activity is especially worrisome. More »

Bone spurs

Bone spurs, also called osteophytes, are outgrowths of bone that develop along the edges of bones, often where two or more bones meet. They can form in the back, hip, sole or heel of the foot, spine, neck, shoulder, or knee. Most bone spurs are caused by tissue damage brought on by osteoarthritis. Many are silent, meaning they cause no symptoms and only detected by an x-ray or other test for another condition. Others cause problems and require treatment. If a spur breaks off from the bone, it can linger in the joint or get stuck in the lining of the joint. Such wandering bone spurs are called loose bodies. A loose body can make it feel like you can't move a joint. This "locking" can come and go. More »

Bell's palsy overview

Bell's palsy, also called facial palsy, is a disorder caused by damage to the facial nerve, the nerve that supplies the muscles of the face. This damage causes partial or total paralysis of one side of the face. No one is certain why Bell's palsy occurs, but it may be due to a virus such as herpes simplex, the common cold sore virus. About 1 of 70 people develop Bell's palsy, usually just once. Symptoms come on suddenly, sometimes preceded by a day or two of pain behind the ear. About half of all people who get Bell's palsy have partial or full paralysis of the face within 48 hours; the rest develop it within five days. Symptoms include: More »