Other Cancers

Other Cancers Articles

You may not need a Pap smear

A number of health organizations have revised screening guidelines for cervical cancer. It’s based on evidence that annual Pap smears do not catch more cancers, but often lead to more invasive diagnostic procedures that can cause complications. Women ages 21 to 65 are now advised to get a Pap smear every three years. Women ages 30 to 65 can prolong screening to every five years if they get a test for human papilloma virus with it. Screening is not recommended for women 65 and older who’ve had normal Pap tests for several years, and not for women at any age who’ve had their cervix removed as part of a hysterectomy. (Locked) More »

Cancer treatments may harm the heart

  Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are increasing the number of people who survive cancer. But they also cause cardiovascular disease in some of the people who get these therapies.   More »

Does colonoscopy save lives?

The wisdom of colonoscopy screening seems obvious. The test enables a physician to examine the lining of the entire colon and to remove small, potentially precancerous growths called polyps during the exam. As a result, it has the potential not only to detect colon cancer early, but also to prevent new cases by removing polyps. It is generally assumed that colonoscopy saves lives because the procedure is good at detecting early disease. A report from the National Polyp Study in the Feb. 23, 2012, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine supports this assumption.  (Locked) More »

Steve Jobs's cancer

Pancreatic cancer is a dreaded and especially deadly type of cancer. Steve Jobs fared better than many with pancreatic cancer. The charismatic co-founder of Apple died on Oct. 5, 2011, almost exactly eight years after his cancer was discovered incidentally on a CT scan of his kidneys . But some cancer specialists would say Jobs didn't have pancreatic cancer at all — at least not in the way it is usually described. He had a rare form of cancer called a neuroendocrine tumor. They do occur in the pancreas, but two-thirds of neuroendocrine tumors develop elsewhere in the body. Neuroendocrine tumors and the kind of cancer that typically affects the pancreas arise from different types of cells, have different symptoms, and are treated differently. People can lead relatively normal lives for several years with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, even if they've metastasized outside the pancreas. Only several thousand cases are diagnosed each year in the United States, although the number has been increasing. (Locked) More »