Other Cancers

Other Cancers Articles

Does colonoscopy save lives?

The wisdom of colonoscopy screening seems obvious. The test enables a physician to examine the lining of the entire colon and to remove small, potentially precancerous growths called polyps during the exam. As a result, it has the potential not only to detect colon cancer early, but also to prevent new cases by removing polyps. It is generally assumed that colonoscopy saves lives because the procedure is good at detecting early disease. A report from the National Polyp Study in the Feb. 23, 2012, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine supports this assumption.  (Locked) More »

Steve Jobs's cancer

Pancreatic cancer is a dreaded and especially deadly type of cancer. Steve Jobs fared better than many with pancreatic cancer. The charismatic co-founder of Apple died on Oct. 5, 2011, almost exactly eight years after his cancer was discovered incidentally on a CT scan of his kidneys . But some cancer specialists would say Jobs didn't have pancreatic cancer at all — at least not in the way it is usually described. He had a rare form of cancer called a neuroendocrine tumor. They do occur in the pancreas, but two-thirds of neuroendocrine tumors develop elsewhere in the body. Neuroendocrine tumors and the kind of cancer that typically affects the pancreas arise from different types of cells, have different symptoms, and are treated differently. People can lead relatively normal lives for several years with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, even if they've metastasized outside the pancreas. Only several thousand cases are diagnosed each year in the United States, although the number has been increasing. (Locked) More »

Are full-body airport scanners safe?

If you're flying somewhere, and the TSA at the airport is using full-body scanning, it's hard not to have at least a passing thought about the radiation exposure. The exposure may be zero if millimeter-wave scanners are being used. But even if the scans are done with the backscatter scanners, the exposure is so minimal — far lower than the radiation exposure during the flight — most people will decide that they have more important things to worry about. (Locked) More »

Obesity: Unhealthy and unmanly

Excess body fat raises levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol and triglycerides while also lowering HDL ("good") cholesterol levels. Obesity impairs the body's responsiveness to insulin, raising blood sugar and insulin levels. Obesity increases the risk of male maladies, ranging from erectile dysfunction to BPH and prostate cancer. It also increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, gallstones, cancer, osteoarthritis, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver, and depression. Obesity and lack of exercise are responsible for about 1,000 American deaths each day, and if present trends continue, they will soon overtake smoking as the leading preventable causes of death in the U.S. More »

On call: Pancreatic cancer prevention

Every time I open a newspaper, I seem to read about another VIP with cancer of the pancreas. It sounds like a dreadful disease. Is there some way I can be tested to see if I'm at risk? (Locked) More »