Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Fruit of the month: Dried fruits

Dried fruits such as raisins, dates, and figs are good sources of potassium, fiber, and other nutrients. A serving size of these calorie-dense treats is just a quarter-cup. (Locked) More »

The not-so-sweet truth about sugar

Sweeteners come in many varieties, including table sugar, honey, and maple syrup, high-fructose corn syrup and agave syrup. But regardless of type, from a biochemical and metabolic standpoint they are all virtually the same. Unfortunately, too much of any type is bad for one’s health. (Locked) More »

Vitamin D supplements linked to lower risk of advanced cancer

A study published by JAMA Network Open found that people taking vitamin D supplements were less likely to have a cancer that spread from the original tumor site to another part of their body or one that proved fatal. However, this risk reduction was only seen in people who were at a normal weight, not those who were overweight or obese. The study did not find that people who took vitamin D were less likely to develop cancer over all compared with those who did not. More »

Eat smart

The right diet may help reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia. Eating foods included in the DASH and Mediterranean diets helps maintain brain health by keeping blood flowing efficiently and reducing the damaging effects of inflammation. Some good foods to add to your diet are fatty fish, berries, plant oils, nuts, and coffee. (Locked) More »

Extra support for better health

A variety of coaches can help people reach their particular health goals. Health and wellness coaches inspire and guide clients to shift their mindset and develop new, healthy behaviors. Fitness professionals—such as personal trainers or exercise physiologists—develop and prescribe exercise regimens to help clients. Dietitians develop eating plans tailored to clients’ needs, such as weight loss or gain, or preventing or treating chronic disease. And culinary coaches use coaching principles and cooking expertise to teach people how to shop for and prepare healthy meals. (Locked) More »

Fruit of the month: Bananas

One of the most popular fruits in the United States, bananas are affordable and available year-round. They’re a good source of potassium, a mineral linked to lower rates of high blood pressure and stroke. More »

Omega-3 fats and your heart

Higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids—specifically, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from fish and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) from plants—may help lower the odds of a poor prognosis in the years following a heart attack. Fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel are good sources of EPA. Flaxseeds, chia seeds, and walnuts are good sources of ALA, which is also found in soybean and canola oil. (Locked) More »

Will these surprising factors really raise your blood sugar?

The Internet contains many claims about factors that increase blood sugar. Some, however, just don’t hold up. For example, stress from sunburn pain, not drinking enough water, and using steroid nasal sprays will not make blood sugar spike. Likewise, it’s unclear if caffeinated coffee, artificial sweeteners, or gum disease will increase blood sugar. However, it is well established that some factors do raise blood sugar over time, such as overeating, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. (Locked) More »

Fruit of the month

Fewer than one in 10 Americans consumes the minimum about of fruit per day, which is 1.5 to 2 cups. Although a cup of fruit juice counts as a serving, choosing fiber-rich whole fruit is a better choice. More »