Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Can you make up for years of poor eating?

Atherosclerosis (clogging of the arteries) may be reversible through intensive lifestyle changes, but because the process is highly challenging, experts say it’s preferable to focus on preventing new damage to avoid a cardiovascular crisis, such as a heart attack or stroke. More »

5 mistakes that will sabotage a healthy diet

Common mistakes can trip up even the best intentions to stay on a particular eating plan. Mistakes include eating a diet that’s too restrictive, overeating in front of TV, keeping the wrong foods in the house, and excluding the wrong foods, such as fruits and healthy fats. One way to stick to a diet is to track food intake. This can be done using a notebook and writing down information or using an app (for an electronic gadget), such as My Fitness Pal (www.myfitnesspal.com) or the USDA’s Food Tracker (www.supertracker.usda.gov). (Locked) More »

Small diet tweaks can help your heart and overall health

Small, gradual diet changes—such as swapping out chips, crackers, or cookies for a handful of mixed nuts—can help lower a person’s risk of cardiovascular disease. Other suggestions include replacing one fast-food hamburger per week with a sandwich (either from a supermarket or homemade); eating an extra serving of fruit per day by adding fresh, frozen, or canned fruit to a serving of yogurt; and adding vegetables such as spinach or kale to a fruit smoothie. The idea is to work on incorporating just one change for a week, then gradually adding more changes over time. The potential benefits may also include weight loss, improved quality of life, and health care cost savings. (Locked) More »

The right plant-based diet for you

Following a plant-based diet is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. But not all plant-based diets are the same. Most emphasize certain foods with heart benefits, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and healthy oils like olive oil. However, some plant foods, such as fruit juices, refined grains like white pasta and white rice, processed breads and cereals, and potatoes can have a harmful effect. The goal is to emphasize heart-healthy plants and switch out unhealthy plant foods as well as animal foods. More »

The skinny on fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, is a dangerous and often difficult to detect condition. The disease affects up to 25% of American adults, 60% of whom are men, and raises a person’s risk of heart disease and diabetes. However, adopting a proper exercise routine and making dietary changes can reduce a person’s risk, and, in someone diagnosed with the disease, even reverse its effects. (Locked) More »

Crave a better appetite

It is common for appetite to decline with age because of loss of taste buds and sense of smell, chewing problems, medication side effects, and gastrointestinal issues. These problems can change men’s eating habits, leading them to move away from healthier foods to ones that can increase their risk of high cholesterol high blood pressure and diabetes. Changing how men approach meals and meal making and addressing medical concerns can often help increase their appetite for healthier fare. (Locked) More »

Surprising sources of dietary fiber

Legumes aren’t the only good source of fiber. Many nuts, seeds, fruits, and vegetables are also loaded with fiber. For example, an ounce of chia seeds (about 2 tablespoons) has about 10 grams of fiber. One cup of either cooked whole-grain Kamut or teff has about 7 grams of fiber. Many fruits are good fiber sources, too, such as raspberries, with 8 grams of fiber in a cup. Vegetables can also be rich in fiber, such as Brussels sprouts or dark, leafy greens. (Locked) More »