Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Do you need a daily supplement?

About 70% of older adults use a daily supplement—either a daily multivitamin or individual vitamin or mineral. Supplements are helpful for people with diagnosed deficiencies, intestinal absorption problems, or certain medical issues that require higher intake of vitamins and minerals. Yet, for most healthy people, it is best to get required daily vitamins and minerals from food and not a pill. More »

Seafood suggestions for heart health

Eating fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, or mackerel at least once a week may help prevent heart attacks and other serious cardiovascular problems, according to a recent scientific advisory from the American Heart Association. Some of this benefit may come from the cardioprotective effects of omega-3 fatty acids, found mainly in fatty fish. These fats appear to help ease inflammation, prevent the formation of dangerous blood clots, and discourage potentially deadly heart arrhythmias. But the lowered heart risk seen in seafood eaters may stem from the fact that they’re not eating beef, pork, or other foods that tend to raise heart disease risk. (Locked) More »

Your health through the decades

By age 60, all men tend to get thrown together into the so-called 60-and-older group, even though there are often significant differences between a man who is 65 and one who is 85. Certain lifestyle habits need to be maintained, no matter what a man’s age, such as adopting a heart-healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, and continuing a regular exercise routine to build strength, flexibility, and cardio fitness. Yet most men also need to place extra attention on certain aspects of their health depending on whether they are in their 60s, 70s, or 80s. (Locked) More »

Are there any health benefits to fish oil?

Fish intake remains an important part of a healthy diet, but the enthusiasm for fish oil supplements has been dampened by several recent studies that showed no benefit for protecting against heart disease, relieving dry eye, or reducing arthritis pain. (Locked) More »

Diet might delay — or hasten — the onset of menopause

Researchers linked consumption of certain foods to age at menopause. They found that women who consumed more oily fish and legumes went through menopause later, while those who ate more refined pasta and rice began the change earlier. Regardless of any potential effect on age at menopause, adopting a healthful diet is always a good idea. (Locked) More »

Eggs might help your heart, not harm it

A study found that people with diabetes or prediabetes who ate 12 eggs a week saw no increase in their cardiovascular risk factors compared with those who ate two eggs or fewer. Another study found that people who ate an egg per day had a lower risk of heart disease compared with those who did not eat any eggs. More »

Getting your five a day

Research has consistently shown that eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. However, many men have trouble reaching this daily quota. To achieve this goal, it’s best to focus on food quality and adding some fruits and vegetables to every meal and snacks. (Locked) More »

The pros and cons of root vegetables

Root vegetables—like sweet potatoes, turnips, and parsnips—are often featured in vegetarian cuisines. They are low in calories and rich in vitamins and minerals. For example, the flesh of a medium baked sweet potato has only 103 calories and enough vitamin A—1,096 micrograms—to meet one’s entire Recommended Dietary Allowance for the day. But most root vegetables are also very high in carbohydrates and should be limited to one serving per day. Easy ways to eat root vegetables: boiled, mashed, baked, roasted with a little olive oil, or tossed into soups and casseroles. (Locked) More »

Fermented foods can add depth to your diet

Fermented foods, which are preserved using an age-old method, can provide health benefits if eaten regularly. Fermented foods containing live active cultures can help support a healthy gut microbiome, which helps to ensure that the lining of the intestines is strong and doesn’t allow digested material to leak out of the intestinal tract. This condition, called leaky gut syndrome, has been linked to a number of chronic diseases and health conditions. (Locked) More »