Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

5 foods to eat (almost) every day

Eating better doesn’t require making drastic changes. Women can improve their diet by adding nutrient-packed foods such as salmon, blueberries, plain yogurt, nuts, and Brussels sprouts. (Locked) More »

Salad greens: Getting the most bang for the bite

Most salad greens contain essential dietary nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and even water. Some of the most nutritious greens include spinach, kale, and romaine lettuce. But some greens, like iceberg lettuce, aren’t nutrient powerhouses. They don’t have to be avoided, but it’s best to mix them with more nutritious greens. About two cups of greens is the equivalent of a one-cup serving of vegetables. The USDA recommends two cups of vegetables per day for women ages 51 or older, and two-and-one-half cups per day for men ages 51 or older. (Locked) More »

The wholesome goodness of grains

People who eat about four servings of whole grains per day may be less likely to die from heart disease than those who eat few or no whole grains. Whole grains contain fiber, which helps people feel full and may lower cholesterol, and also contain magnesium, which may help lower blood pressure. Good sources include whole-wheat bread, ready-to-eat cereals made from oats or other whole grains, brown rice, and barley. (Locked) More »

Beyond the morning buzz: How does coffee affect your heart?

People who drink about three cups of coffee a day are slightly less likely to develop heart disease or to die from it than people who don’t drink coffee. In sensitive people, the caffeine in coffee may trigger a pounding, irregular heartbeat. Drinking unfiltered (French press or Turkish) coffee may slightly raise cholesterol levels. But in general, even for people with heart disease, modest coffee consumption appears to be safe. However, people should not rely on coffee to spend less time sleeping, because sleep deprivation is very hard on the heart. (Locked) More »

Can vitamin K supplements help protect against heart disease?

Some research has suggested that eating foods rich in vitamin K, which helps the body make blood clotting proteins, can protect against heart disease. However, vitamin K supplements have not shown the same benefit and are not recommended for preventing heart disease. (Locked) More »

Confused about eating soy?

Eating soy may not help your heart, but it won’t hurt your heart. It’s high in polyunsaturated fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and it’s low in saturated fat. More »

Vegetable of the month: Artichokes

Artichokes contain cynarin, a biologically active chemical that seems to increase the liver's production of bile, which helps remove cholesterol from the body. (Locked) More »