Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

The lowdown on low-calorie sweeteners

An advisory from the American Heart Association says beverages with low-calorie sweeteners are an acceptable way to curb the use of regular sugar-sweetened beverages, which are linked to diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, and other risks for heart disease. Short-term studies suggest that replacing regular sugary soda with diet soda helps people control their weight, while longer-term studies are less definitive. But two large, long-running Harvard studies found no increased risk of obesity and diabetes among people who regularly drank beverages with low-calorie sweeteners. (Locked) More »

Is low-fat or full-fat the better choice for dairy products?

Full-fat dairy products can bring health risks because of the high levels of saturated fat they contain. To ensure good health and good nutrition, it’s important to keep tabs on the amount of saturated fat you eat, and focus on eating a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and healthy fats. (Locked) More »

Know the facts about fats

Your body needs some fat, but it’s important you eat the right kind. . People should eliminate or reduce saturated fat found in animal products like beef, pork, and high fat dairy foods, and increase their intake of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in avocados, peanut butter, nuts and seeds, and plant oils. (Locked) More »

Should you try the keto diet?

The ketogenic diet deprives the body of carbohydrates for fuel. Instead, the body uses ketone bodies, a type of fuel that the liver produces from stored fat. Keto diet followers must eat fat at each meal. In a daily 2,000-calorie diet, that might look like 165 grams of fat, 40 grams of carbs, and 75 grams of protein. Ditching carbs means limiting fruits and vegetables, which raises the risk for nutrient deficiencies. The keto diet also increases the risk for kidney, liver, mood, and thinking problems. More »

Do you need a daily supplement?

About 70% of older adults use a daily supplement—either a daily multivitamin or individual vitamin or mineral. Supplements are helpful for people with diagnosed deficiencies, intestinal absorption problems, or certain medical issues that require higher intake of vitamins and minerals. Yet, for most healthy people, it is best to get required daily vitamins and minerals from food and not a pill. More »

The hidden dangers of protein powders

Protein powder supplements can harbor health risks. They may have hidden unhealthy ingredients, such as added sugars and too many calories. Some research has found that many protein powders contain heavy metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury), bisphenol-A (BPA, which is used to make plastic), pesticides, and other contaminants with links to cancer and other health conditions. However, chemical-free protein powders may be helpful—with medical supervision—for certain conditions, such as impaired appetite or wounds that are resistant to healing. (Locked) More »