Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

6 simple tips to reduce your blood pressure

Many women suddenly found themselves with a diagnosis of high blood pressure when the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association lowered the threshold for high blood pressure to 130/80 from 140/90. Small strategies, such as watching sodium intake and losing even a small amount of weight can help reduce blood pressure. More »

Beyond the morning buzz: How does coffee affect your heart?

People who drink about three cups of coffee a day are slightly less likely to develop heart disease or to die from it than people who don’t drink coffee. In sensitive people, the caffeine in coffee may trigger a pounding, irregular heartbeat. Drinking unfiltered (French press or Turkish) coffee may slightly raise cholesterol levels. But in general, even for people with heart disease, modest coffee consumption appears to be safe. However, people should not rely on coffee to spend less time sleeping, because sleep deprivation is very hard on the heart. (Locked) More »

Can vitamin K supplements help protect against heart disease?

Some research has suggested that eating foods rich in vitamin K, which helps the body make blood clotting proteins, can protect against heart disease. However, vitamin K supplements have not shown the same benefit and are not recommended for preventing heart disease. (Locked) More »

Confused about eating soy?

Eating soy may not help your heart, but it won’t hurt your heart. It’s high in polyunsaturated fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and it’s low in saturated fat. More »

Vegetable of the month: Artichokes

Artichokes contain cynarin, a biologically active chemical that seems to increase the liver's production of bile, which helps remove cholesterol from the body. (Locked) More »

The growing role of probiotics

The “good” bacteria called probiotics can help maintain a healthy gut, ward off illnesses, and maintain a smooth digestion. Fermented foods like yogurt, pickles, sourdough bread, and certain cheeses are the best sources of probiotics, and men should try to add more of them to their daily diet. (Locked) More »

Vegetable of the month: Beets

 Image: EvergreenPlanet; © Anna Kucherova/Thinkstock Despite their striking colors — ruby red, golden yellow, and even candy-striped — beets aren't exactly the most popular vegetable on the block. But what if you make them sound more enticing? It turns out that people may eat more "dynamite chili and tangy lime-seasoned beets" than plain old "beets." In a study done at a Stanford University cafeteria, researchers found that people ate about 25% more vegetables if the selections were described in indulgent terms rather than basic or healthy terms (such as "lighter-choice beets with no added sugar") even though all the dishes were prepared exactly the same way. Other examples of indulgently named veggie dishes included "zesty ginger-turmeric sweet potatoes" and "sweet sizzlin' green beans and crispy shallots." So if you're hoping to entice friends or family to try beets (or other vegetables), add some appealing adjectives to the description. (Locked) More »