Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

The smart way to look at carbohydrates

Many people believe a healthy diet means reducing or eliminating carbohydrates, but carbs provide the body’s primary energy source, glucose, which fuels everything from breathing to thinking to running. The Institute of Medicine recommends adults get 45% to 65% of their daily calories from carbs, but they should be from healthier sources like nutrient-rich whole grains, legumes, nuts, fruit, vegetables, and dairy. (Locked) More »

When it comes to protein, how much is too much?

You've probably heard the claims by now:  Here's a diet that's delicious, easy to stick with, and guaranteed to help you lose weight effortlessly.  Or, perhaps it's supposed to build muscle, protect your joints or prevent Alzheimer's.  Whatever the diet and whatever the claim, there's a good chance that it is, indeed, too good to be true. In recent years, high protein diets are among the most popular, whether the protein is consumed as a supplement (protein shakes for body builders!) or simply a larger than usual portion of a balanced diet (such as The Zone, Atkins or Paleo Diets). More »

Drink your fruits and vegetables?

People who struggle to eat the recommended amount of vegetables and fruits each day can drink low-sodium vegetable juice, although a fresh raw salad is a better choice. Fruit juices, which are high in sugar and calories, should be limited to a half-cup daily. Blended smoothies that combine fruits, vegetables, and other healthful foods (such as yogurt, nut butters, and chia or flax seeds) are another option. (Locked) More »

Inflammatory foods are linked with higher colon cancer risk

People who followed an “inflammatory” diet that contained red and processed meat and refined grains had a 44% greater risk of developing colon cancer compared with people who ate a low-inflammation diet, which included high amounts of green leafy vegetables and whole grains. More »

Losing weight helps your partner slim down, too

People who make an effort to lose weight by joining a weight-loss program can help their partner do the same. Researchers believed this was due to a “ripple effect” in which people are more likely to adopt their partner’s new healthy habits. More »

Vegetable of the month: Red cabbage

Red cabbage, which is high in vitamin C but low in calories, gets its brilliant color from anthocyanins. These plant chemicals are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. More »

Ways to dig out of a dietary rut

Sometimes older adults get into a menu rut or stop eating healthy, nutritious foods. This may reflect issues with money, mobility, or loneliness. A dietary rut may lead to a reliance on prepackaged foods, and even malnutrition. Suggestions to break out of a dietary rut include trying new foods; cooking in large quantities, with leftovers that can be eaten throughout the week; signing up for subscription meal kits; inviting friends to dinner; and asking friends to pitch in with a meal, with each person taking turns shopping and cooking. (Locked) More »