Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Homemade, low-sugar apple cinnamon raisin granola recipe

I love granola, but I don't love the added sugar in most store-bought brands. I set out in search of a recipe that met my strict criteria: Tasty, easy, and no added sugar. Believe it or not, there's quite a few out there, most using applesauce as a binder and sweetener. I tried several, and after some fun (and filling) trial and error, ended up creating my own version. This recipe is extremely easy, flexible, and forgiving. This is a one-bowl deal: throw it all in, mix it all up, bake it altogether. You can interchange the ingredients to create your own preferred combination of nuts, seeds, dried fruits, and spices. And, it doesn't have to be perfect. Got more or less of one ingredient? That's OK, add more or less of another. No need to be exact. Yes, it has sugar, but it's all naturally occurring fruit sugars, no processed added sugars. More »

Does drinking coffee offer health benefits?

Drinking regular coffee is linked with lower rates of diseases and a longer life span, although science still cannot provide solid evidence for its potential benefit. Still, enjoying a daily cup or two does not present any major risks, although a person should be careful about consuming too much caffeine from coffee, as high amounts can lead to acid reflux and a rapid heart rate. (Locked) More »

Pulse power: Easy ways to make plant-based proteins a regular part of your diet

Pulses are legumes harvested for their dried seeds, such as chickpeas, lentils, and dried peas and beans. They’re an important source of protein, fiber, and many other nutrients. Now pulses are being used in products such as pastas, crackers, and even brownie mix. When buying pulse-based products, it’s important to check the ingredients list to see if the pulses are just filler or are the bulk of the product, and whether the product is loaded with sugar, sodium, and saturated fat. (Locked) More »

A salad a day keeps stroke away?

Eating plenty of nitrate-rich vegetables—such as lettuce, spinach, and beets—may lower a person’s risk of dying of a stroke or heart attack. The body converts nitrates into nitric oxide, a compound that lowers blood pressure. More »

Food trends and your heart

The type and amount of fat, carbohydrate, sugar, and salt in our food supply has changed over the years. Some of these trends (such as the banning of harmful trans fatty acids) have been positive. But to date, efforts to reduce sugar and sodium haven’t been as successful. When shopping for processed foods—anything bagged, packaged, canned, or bottled—people should check the Nutrition Facts label. The healthiest choices contain less than 5% of the Daily Value for saturated fat and sodium, and less than 12 grams of sugar per serving. (Locked) More »