Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Can you make up for years of poor eating?

Atherosclerosis (clogging of the arteries) may be reversible through intensive lifestyle changes, but because the process is highly challenging, experts say it’s preferable to focus on preventing new damage to avoid a cardiovascular crisis, such as a heart attack or stroke. More »

Vegetable of the month: Beets

 Image: EvergreenPlanet; © Anna Kucherova/Thinkstock Despite their striking colors — ruby red, golden yellow, and even candy-striped — beets aren't exactly the most popular vegetable on the block. But what if you make them sound more enticing? It turns out that people may eat more "dynamite chili and tangy lime-seasoned beets" than plain old "beets." In a study done at a Stanford University cafeteria, researchers found that people ate about 25% more vegetables if the selections were described in indulgent terms rather than basic or healthy terms (such as "lighter-choice beets with no added sugar") even though all the dishes were prepared exactly the same way. Other examples of indulgently named veggie dishes included "zesty ginger-turmeric sweet potatoes" and "sweet sizzlin' green beans and crispy shallots." So if you're hoping to entice friends or family to try beets (or other vegetables), add some appealing adjectives to the description. (Locked) More »

5 mistakes that will sabotage a healthy diet

Common mistakes can trip up even the best intentions to stay on a particular eating plan. Mistakes include eating a diet that’s too restrictive, overeating in front of TV, keeping the wrong foods in the house, and excluding the wrong foods, such as fruits and healthy fats. One way to stick to a diet is to track food intake. This can be done using a notebook and writing down information or using an app (for an electronic gadget), such as My Fitness Pal (www.myfitnesspal.com) or the USDA’s Food Tracker (www.supertracker.usda.gov). (Locked) More »

The right plant-based diet for you

Following a plant-based diet is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. But not all plant-based diets are the same. Most emphasize certain foods with heart benefits, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and healthy oils like olive oil. However, some plant foods, such as fruit juices, refined grains like white pasta and white rice, processed breads and cereals, and potatoes can have a harmful effect. The goal is to emphasize heart-healthy plants and switch out unhealthy plant foods as well as animal foods. More »

The skinny on fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, is a dangerous and often difficult to detect condition. The disease affects up to 25% of American adults, 60% of whom are men, and raises a person’s risk of heart disease and diabetes. However, adopting a proper exercise routine and making dietary changes can reduce a person’s risk, and, in someone diagnosed with the disease, even reverse its effects. (Locked) More »