Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

A quick-start guide to the latest food terminology

New terminology describing how foods are produced can be confusing, and doesn’t always indicate if a food is better for health. For example, non-GMO foods contain no genetically modified organisms (GMOs). But it’s heavily debated whether use of GMOs alters the nutritional quality of food or poses a threat to health. It’s helpful to learn the meaning of such terms such as non-GMO, grass-fed beef, free-range chickens, pasture-raised chickens, and wild-caught salmon. (Locked) More »

How to stick to a low-salt diet when dining out

Most restaurant offerings are very high in sodium, a known contributor to high blood pressure. But people can limit their sodium when eating out by checking online nutrition information, which is required by law in restaurants with more than 20 locations. Other tips include avoiding foods that are smoked or cured, as well as processed or instant food commonly found in fast-food restaurants. Another strategy is to frequent farm-to-table establishments that serve fresh, locally produced foods, and asking the chef to grill, broil, or steam the food with no added sauces or seasonings. (Locked) More »

Is your diet interfering with your medication regimen?

Many foods, drinks, or ingredients in diet can undermine the effects of certain medications. For example, drinking alcohol can diminish the effects of erectile dysfunction drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra), or cause extreme drowsiness when taken with antihistamines. Eating foods high with lots of sodium or salt can nullify the effects of diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs. Eating black licorice while taking digoxin (Lanoxin) to treat heart failure may cause an irregular heartbeat and heart attack. When prescribed a new medicine, one should ask if diet will affect the drug. (Locked) More »

Why nutritionists are crazy about nuts

Eating fewer than five 1.5-ounce servings per week of nuts and seeds has been linked to an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To reduce health risks, snack on nuts and seeds, substitute them for meat, or add them to cereals, salads, and main dishes. (Locked) More »

Breakfast and beyond: The case for a healthy morning meal

Skipping breakfast puts a strain on your body, which may increase the risk of insulin resistance, high blood pressure, and cholesterol problems. Breakfast may also help people maintain a healthy body weight. A healthy breakfast should include lean protein, whole-grain carbohydrates, healthy fat, and fresh fruit. (Locked) More »

Is your salad dressing hurting your healthy diet?

Store-bought salad dressings often have extra calories, sodium, added sugar, saturated fat, and preservatives. One should look for dressing that has no more than 120 calories, 200 milligrams (mg) of sodium, 2 grams of sugar, and 1 gram of saturated fat per serving. If a favorite dressing exceeds those limits, dietitians recommend using only half a serving and mixing it with vinegar. It’s best to make a salad dressing at home with healthy ingredients such as olive oil, vinegar, garlic, mustard, spices, and citrus juice. (Locked) More »