Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Cracking the coconut craze

Coconut oil has been touted as a healthy food choice, specifically for the heart. But because of its high saturated fat content, coconut oil tends to raise cholesterol levels, perhaps making it a less than ideal choice for people who want to avoid heart disease. Coconut oil tends to raise beneficial HDL cholesterol more than other fats do, possibly because it is rich in lauric acid, a fatty acid that’s processed slightly differently by the body than other saturated fats. Also, some evidence suggests that coconut oil may not raise total cholesterol as much as butter does. But there is no good evidence that consuming coconut oil can lower heart disease risk. (Locked) More »

More green, less red

A semi-vegetarian diet can help men adopt a more plant-based diet in which they cut out the red and processed meat and eat healthier animal products like seafood and poultry only occasionally. This can increase their intake of antioxidants, essential vitamins and minerals, and fiber while cutting back on the quantity and frequency of meat, which can contain high amounts of saturated fats, sodium, and chemical additives. (Locked) More »

Nordic diet linked to lower stroke risk

Following a Nordic diet may help lower the risk of stroke. This eating pattern features fish, whole grains, plus fruits (such as apples and pears) and vegetables (such as carrots and cabbage) popular in Scandinavian countries. More »

The lowdown on constipation

About one-third of adults ages 60 and older report at least occasional constipation, which can leave them feeling bloated, uncomfortable, and sluggish. However, constipation is often easy to treat and manage with diet modifications, like adding more fiber and drinking enough water, and adopting regular exercise. (Locked) More »

Choosing a calcium supplement

Expert agree that the ideal way to get the nutrients you need to stay healthy is from food. But when it comes to taking calcium, some people may not find it practical or possible to meet the recommended daily intake (RDI) from diet alone. For adults, the RDI is 1,000 milligrams (mg) daily, which rises to 1,200 mg per day for women over age 50 and men over age 70. If your doctor advises you to take a calcium supplement, how do you choose among the dizzying array of available choices, which include pills, chewable tablets, flavored chews, and liquids? The following information may help you decide. The calcium in supplements is found in combination with another substance, typically carbonate or citrate. Each has benefits and downsides. Calcium carbonate supplements tends to be the best value, because they contain the highest amount of elemental calcium (about 40% by weight). Because calcium carbonate requires stomach acid for absorption, it's best to take this product with food. Most people tolerate calcium carbonate well, but some people complain of mild constipation or feeling bloated. Some well-known calcium carbonate products include Caltrate, Viactiv Calcium Chews, Os-Cal, and Tums. More »

Get cooking at home

Many older men have never developed or have lost touch with basic culinary skills, and thus have gotten used to eating out and becoming dependent on processed and prepared foods. Yet, by learning some basic cooking techniques, older men can make a small number of stable items that can help create healthy, low-calorie, and inexpensive meals at home. (Locked) More »

Spotting whole grains at the grocery store

Some people may be confused about what constitutes a whole grain. Whole grains are seeds or kernels that have three parts: the bran, germ, and endosperm. Common varieties of whole grains include wheat, barley, brown rice, corn, rye, oats, and wild rice. Buy whole grains in a package or in various products, such as whole-grain pasta, whole-grain bread, whole-grain cereal, or whole-grain crackers. Avoid refined grains that have only the endosperm, such as white flour and white rice. (Locked) More »