Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

When it comes to protein, how much is too much?

You've probably heard the claims by now:  Here's a diet that's delicious, easy to stick with, and guaranteed to help you lose weight effortlessly.  Or, perhaps it's supposed to build muscle, protect your joints or prevent Alzheimer's.  Whatever the diet and whatever the claim, there's a good chance that it is, indeed, too good to be true. In recent years, high protein diets are among the most popular, whether the protein is consumed as a supplement (protein shakes for body builders!) or simply a larger than usual portion of a balanced diet (such as The Zone, Atkins or Paleo Diets). More »

5 foods to eat (almost) every day

Eating better doesn’t require making drastic changes. Women can improve their diet by adding nutrient-packed foods such as salmon, blueberries, plain yogurt, nuts, and Brussels sprouts. (Locked) More »

Losing weight helps your partner slim down, too

People who make an effort to lose weight by joining a weight-loss program can help their partner do the same. Researchers believed this was due to a “ripple effect” in which people are more likely to adopt their partner’s new healthy habits. More »

Salad greens: Getting the most bang for the bite

Most salad greens contain essential dietary nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and even water. Some of the most nutritious greens include spinach, kale, and romaine lettuce. But some greens, like iceberg lettuce, aren’t nutrient powerhouses. They don’t have to be avoided, but it’s best to mix them with more nutritious greens. About two cups of greens is the equivalent of a one-cup serving of vegetables. The USDA recommends two cups of vegetables per day for women ages 51 or older, and two-and-one-half cups per day for men ages 51 or older. (Locked) More »

The wholesome goodness of grains

People who eat about four servings of whole grains per day may be less likely to die from heart disease than those who eat few or no whole grains. Whole grains contain fiber, which helps people feel full and may lower cholesterol, and also contain magnesium, which may help lower blood pressure. Good sources include whole-wheat bread, ready-to-eat cereals made from oats or other whole grains, brown rice, and barley. (Locked) More »

Can vitamin K supplements help protect against heart disease?

Some research has suggested that eating foods rich in vitamin K, which helps the body make blood clotting proteins, can protect against heart disease. However, vitamin K supplements have not shown the same benefit and are not recommended for preventing heart disease. (Locked) More »

Confused about eating soy?

Eating soy may not help your heart, but it won’t hurt your heart. It’s high in polyunsaturated fats, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and it’s low in saturated fat. More »