Nutrition

Nutrition Articles

Can diet heal chronic pain?

Chronic pain is often the result of chronic inflammation, and the evidence is quite strong that a person’s diet can contribute to inflammation as well as help to reduce it. Research has found that the best way to control inflammation and help ease chronic pain is to reduce amounts of known inflammatory foods, like processed “junk” foods, and eat a variety of foods that can strengthen the immune system, which helps keep inflammation under control. (Locked) More »

Precious metals and other important minerals for health

The body doesn’t manufacture essential minerals, such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, chromium, copper, and iron. Instead, the minerals come from diet. Most people can meet recommended intakes of dietary minerals by eating a healthy diet rich in fresh foods. But some minerals, such as magnesium, iron, potassium, and calcium, may be harder for people to obtain in the proper amounts. In those cases, it may be necessary to increase dietary intake of certain minerals or to take a dietary supplement. But it depends on an individual’s needs. (Locked) More »

Clean out your pantry, clean up your health

The typical American pantry is loaded with unhealthy foods. Boxed, bagged, canned, and jarred foods are often brimming with refined grains, salt, added sugars, or saturated fat. Rather than risk temptation by keeping processed, unhealthy foods in the pantry, it’s a good idea to swap them for healthier foods. Ideas include swapping refined bread products for whole-grain versions, and trading bottled marinades for homemade spice rubs. Replace treats like cookies with fresh fruit. (Locked) More »

The smart way to look at carbohydrates

Many people believe a healthy diet means reducing or eliminating carbohydrates, but carbs provide the body’s primary energy source, glucose, which fuels everything from breathing to thinking to running. The Institute of Medicine recommends adults get 45% to 65% of their daily calories from carbs, but they should be from healthier sources like nutrient-rich whole grains, legumes, nuts, fruit, vegetables, and dairy. (Locked) More »

Ways to dig out of a dietary rut

Sometimes older adults get into a menu rut or stop eating healthy, nutritious foods. This may reflect issues with money, mobility, or loneliness. A dietary rut may lead to a reliance on prepackaged foods, and even malnutrition. Suggestions to break out of a dietary rut include trying new foods; cooking in large quantities, with leftovers that can be eaten throughout the week; signing up for subscription meal kits; inviting friends to dinner; and asking friends to pitch in with a meal, with each person taking turns shopping and cooking. (Locked) More »