Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Now hear this: You may need hearing aids

Some estimates suggest that by age 65, about one-third of men need hearing aids; however, only half of this group wear them. Many men resist hearing aids because they symbolize declining health, but these tiny devices can improve their communication skills, their relationships, and even their brain function.  (Locked) More »

Overcoming anxiety

Millions of older adults suffer from anxiety. Idleness in retirement, financial worries, and health issues are the leading causes of anxiety among older men. However, the condition is highly treatable with therapy, medication, and simple lifestyle changes. More »

Treating low testosterone levels

Testosterone is the hormone that gives men their manliness. Produced by the testicles, it is responsible for male characteristics like a deep voice, muscular build, and facial hair. Testosterone also fosters the production of red blood cells, boosts mood, keeps bones strong, and aids thinking ability. Testosterone levels peak by early adulthood and drop as you age—about 1% to 2% a year beginning in the 40s.  As men reach their 50s and beyond, this may lead to signs and symptoms, such as impotence or changes in sexual desire, depression or anxiety, reduced muscle mass, less energy, weight gain, anemia, and hot flashes. While falling testosterone levels are a normal part of aging, certain conditions can hasten the decline. These include: More »

HDL cholesterol: How much is enough?

When it comes to cholesterol, people want less of the “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and more of the “good” high-density lipoprotein (HDL) kind. This combination is often associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. But while most attention is spent on driving down bad LDL, you still have to keep your eyes on the good HDL, as some research suggests that after a certain threshold, higher levels don’t offer extra protection. (Locked) More »

Men: talk with your doctor about resuming sex after a heart attack

A majority of men do not talk about resuming their sex life after a heart attack, which may lead to sexual problems like lack of interest and erectile difficulties. Researchers say that before being discharged from the hospital, men should expect to have a conversation with their physician about when it’s okay to resume all regular activities, including sex. If the topic does not come up, men should take the initiative. More »

Talk to the animals

Animal-assistant therapy (AAT)—which involves regular interaction with animals like dogs, cats, and even horses—can have both immediate and long-lasting impacts on your emotional and mental health. AAT is used to treat depression, stress, and anxiety, and older men also can use it to combat the challenges of aging, such as dealing with the loss of a loved one or declining health. (Locked) More »