Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles


A vasectomy is a minor surgical procedure that is done to make a man sterile (unable to father children). The procedure is usually done by a urologist, a specialist who deals with the male reproductive system. A vasectomy cuts or blocks the vas deferens, the tube that carries sperm away from the testicle to be added to semen. There are two vas deferens, one for each testicle on each side. Once the vas deferens are cut or blocked, sperm cannot pass from the place where there are manufactured, the testicle, to the reservoir where semen and prostatic secretions (secretions from the prostate gland) are stored. It is the combination of sperm and the secretions from the prostate that allow sperm to survive. During ejaculation, this sperm containing fluid is ejected through the ejaculatory duct and through the penis during orgasm. After a vasectomy, a man can continue to have normal erections, normal sexual intercourse and normal ejaculations of semen, but this ejaculate is sperm-free and cannot impregnate a female sexual partner. (Locked) More »


Balanitis is an infection or inflammation of the skin on the head (glans) of the penis. In men who are not circumcised, this area is covered by a flap of skin known as the foreskin, or prepuce. Balanitis can occur in both circumcised and uncircumcised men, although it occurs more commonly in men who are not circumcised. Young boys generally are affected only if they have a very tight foreskin that is difficult to pull back. (Locked) More »

Enlarged Prostate (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

The prostate is a small gland approximately the size and shape of a walnut. It sits directly below the bladder, in front of the rectum. The prostate is a part of the male reproductive tract. It produces fluid that combines with sperm to make semen. At birth, the prostate gland is tiny. When testosterone levels rise during puberty, the prostate grows rapidly, doubling in size by age 20. Growth slows down for the next two decades and the prostate usually does not cause problems for many years. Less than 10% of 30-year-old men have an enlarged prostate. When a man reaches his 40s, the prostate goes through a second growth spurt. Half of all men have an enlarged prostate by the time they reach age 60, and by age 85, 90% of men have an enlarged prostate.   (Locked) More »

Phimosis and Paraphimosis

In an uncircumcised male, the head of the penis is covered by a sheath of skin known as the foreskin. Phimosis is a condition in which the foreskin is tightly stretched around the head of the penis and cannot be pulled back freely. Phimosis can occur naturally. For example, in boys younger than age 4, it is normally hard to pull back the foreskin. However, in older boys and men, phimosis often is triggered by an infection under the foreskin (balanitis) or by other medical conditions such as diabetes. Paraphimosis occurs when a tight foreskin is pulled back behind the head of the penis and then becomes stuck. It cannot be placed forward again to its usual position covering the tip of the penis. This can cause swelling, pain, and loss of blood flow to the tip of the penis. If the foreskin cannot be pushed back into its natural position, serious harm can occur. (Locked) More »

Jock Itch (Tinea Cruris)

The term "jock itch" typically describes an itchy rash in a man's groin. Although there are many causes of jock itch, this term has become synonymous with tinea cruris, a common fungal infection that affects the groin and inner thighs of men and woman. Tinea is the name of the fungus; cruris comes from the Latin word for leg. Jock itch can develop when tight garments trap moisture and heat. This creates an environment in which fungi multiply and flourish. Athletes often get jock itch. It occurs more commonly in men, but can affect women as well. The jock itch fungus may cause a rash on the upper and inner thighs, the armpits, and the area just underneath the breasts Many people with tinea cruris also have athlete's foot. Athlete's foot is called tinea pedis.   (Locked) More »

Epididymitis And Orchitis

Epididymitis is an inflammation of the epididymis. The epididymis is the coiled tube at the back of the testicle. In most cases, an infection causes this inflammation. Orchitis is an infection of the testicle. It is much less common than epididymitis. Orchitis usually spreads to the testicle through the bloodstream. Viruses commonly cause the infection. Epididymo-orchitis is an inflammation of both the epididymis and the testicle. (Locked) More »

Retrograde Ejaculation

Ejaculation is the ejection of semen out of the urethra (passageway inside the penis) when a man has an orgasm. Under normal circumstances, ejaculation propels semen forward through a man's urethra and out the tip of his penis. This is because a tiny sphincter (circular muscle) at the entrance to the bladder shuts the opening to the bladder and prevents semen from entering. Retrograde ejaculation is when the semen travels backwards into the bladder. (Locked) More »

Curvature of the Penis (Peyronie's Disease)

Peyronie's disease is a curve in the penis. Many men have a slight curve in the penis. As long as there is no pain or problem with sexual performance, men with a slightly curved penis should not be concerned. They do not need to see a doctor. However, some men develop a more serious bend in the penis. This bend interferes with sexual function or causes pain. This occasionally happens after the penis is injured. Injury may occur during intercourse or from a motor vehicle or industrial accident. Most cases, however, are the result of a poorly understood process known as Peyronie's disease. (Locked) More »

Impotence (Erectile Dysfunction)

Impotence means that a man's penis doesn't get hard enough to have sexual intercourse. The man cannot get or maintain an erection. The medical term is erectile dysfunction (ED).   (Locked) More »

Acute Prostatitis

What Is It? The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that sits below the bladder in men. This gland makes fluid that mixes with sperm to form semen. Because the prostate surrounds the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body from the bladder), conditions that cause the prostate to swell or enlarge may press on the urethra and cause pain or problems with urination. Prostatitis is inflammation of the prostate gland. Acute prostatitis is inflammation of the prostate gland that results in sudden onset of symptoms. Acute prostatitis is caused by an infection, usually by bacteria that get into the prostate by traveling up the urethra. Some of these bacteria are the normal germs that live on and inside your body. Other infections are transmitted through sexual contact. (Locked) More »