Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Emergencies and First Aid - Bleeding

While a minor cut will eventually stop bleeding, a severe injury may require elevation and direct pressure on the wound. The goals of first-aid treatment are to control bleeding and prevent infection. If disposable surgical gloves are readily available, use them. Butterfly Bandages How to Stop a Nosebleed More »

Emergencies and First Aid - Heimlich Maneuver on a Child

Stand behind the child. With your arms around his or her waist, form a fist with one hand and place it, thumb side in, between the ribs and waistline. Grab your fist with your other hand. Keeping your arms off the child's rib cage, give four quick inward and upward thrusts. You may have to repeat this several times until the obstructing object is coughed out.     More »

Emergencies and First Aid - Heimlich Maneuver on an Adult

If the person is sitting or standing, stand behind him or her. Form a fist with one hand and place your fist, thumb side in, just below the person'’s rib cage in the front. Grab your fist with your other hand. Keeping your arms off the person’'s rib cage, give four quick inward and upward thrusts. You may have to repeat this several times until the obstructing object is coughed out. If the person is lying down or unconscious, straddle him or her and place the heel of your hand just above the waistline. Place your other hand on top of this hand. Keeping your elbows straight, give four quick upward thrusts. You may have to repeat this procedure several times until the obstructing object is coughed out.     More »

Emergencies and First Aid - Heimlich Maneuver on an Infant

1 Place the infant face down across your forearm (resting your forearm on your leg) and support the infant'’s head with your hand. Give four forceful blows to the back with the heel of your hand. You may have to repeat this several times until the obstructing object is coughed out. 2 If this does not work, turn the baby over. With two fingers one finger width below an imaginary line connecting the nipples, give four forceful thrusts to the chest to a depth of 1 inch. You may have to repeat this several times until the obstructing object is coughed out.     More »

Emergencies and First Aid - How to Make a Sling

1. To make a sling, cut a piece of cloth, such as a pillowcase, about 40 inches square. Then cut or fold the square diagonally to make a triangle. Slip one end of the bandage under the arm and over the shoulder. Bring the other end of the bandage over the other shoulder, cradling the arm. More »

Emergencies and First Aid - How to Splint a Fracture

For a lower arm or wrist fracture (left), carefully place a folded newspaper, magazine, or heavy piece of clothing under the arm. Tie it in place with pieces of cloth. A lower leg or ankle fracture (right) can be splinted similarly, with a bulky garment or blanket wrapped and secured around the limb. More »

Emergencies and First Aid -— Broken Bones

Broken bones (fractures) are usually not life-threatening. A fracture may not be visible to you through the skin. Symptoms include intense pain, swelling, increased pain when trying to move the injured area, or bleeding. A broken bone always requires medical attention. Immediate careCall out for someone to get help, or call 911 yourself. Do not move or straighten the broken bone. Splinting is not necessary unless the person needs to be moved without assistance from ambulance personnel or unless the fracture has blocked blood supply to the limb. If the fracture site is deformed and the skin beyond the site of the fracture is cold, pale, and blue, pull gently lengthwise on the limb to straighten the fracture and then splint the limb. How to Make a Sling More »

When You Visit Your Doctor - Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

Over the past month, how often have you had a sensation of not emptying your bladder completely after you finished urinating? Over the past month, how often have you had to urinate again less than two hours after you finished urinating? Over the past month, how often have you found you stopped and started again several times when you urinated? Over the past month, how often have you found it difficult to postpone urination? Over the past month, how often have you had a weak urinary stream? Over the past month, how often have you had to push or strain to begin urination? Over the past month, how many times did you most typically get up to urinate from the time you went to bed at night until the time you got up in the morning? If you were to spend the rest of your life with your urinary condition just the way it is now, how would you feel about that? Have you had blood in your urine, or urinary tract infections? Have you ever had surgery on your prostate, bladder, or kidneys? Do you have gastrointestinal problems such as diverticulitis or constipation? Do you have diabetes? Does anyone in your family have diabetes? Have you been unusually thirsty or had unintentional weight loss? Have you ever had a stroke or nervous system disease? Have you ever had a back injury or back surgery? What medications are you taking (prescription and over-the-counter)? What do you know about medical and surgical treatment options used in the treatment of benign prostatic enlargement? Do you know the side effects that can occur with medications? Do you know the complications associated with surgery? Do you know how much benefit you can expect from each type of treatment? Do you know the risks of waiting, and doing nothing at all? Abdominal examination Neurological examination Digital rectal examination Genital examination Urinalysis (for glucose, red blood cells, white blood cells, and bacteria) Blood tests (for kidney function and prostate-specific antigen or PSA) Cystoscopy Ultrasound of the bladder after you urinate (post void residual) Ultrasound of the kidneys Pelvic CT scan   More »

When You Visit Your Doctor - Erectile Dysfunction or Impotence

Do you smoke cigarettes? Have you been screened for other medical problems such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, and diabetes? Do you exercise regularly? How much? How often? Do you have a neurologic disease or sickle-cell disease? Are you taking any medications (prescription or over-the-counter)? Has your erectile dysfunction worsened since starting any new medications? What effect is your erectile dysfunction having on your relationship? Your self-esteem? How long have you had erectile problems? Do you have erectile problems sometimes or all of the time? Have you ever had any psychologically stressful sexual experiences? Are you less interested in sex (diminished libido)? Are you having difficulty achieving an erection or sustaining it? Do you ever awaken with early morning or nocturnal erections? Do you have pain with erections? Penile bumps or lumps? History of penile trauma? History of pelvic surgery? What are your goals in receiving treatment? What therapies have you tried? Do you know how much benefit you can expect from medical therapies? Do you know the side effects and important drug interactions? Genital examination Rectal examination Pulses in the groin and feet Neurologic examination Blood tests (complete blood count or CBC, glucose, cholesterol panels, thyroid function tests, prolactin level) Blood testosterone level (if libido is decreased) Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) Neurologic testing (nerve condition studies) Your doctor may decide to do some vascular tests to establish whether the arteries that supply blood to the penis during erections are narrowed.   More »