Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

AAA screening

I am a 72-year-old male in excellent health. I have been diagnosed with a 3.7-centimeter aortic aneurysm. My doctor recommends an ultrasound every six months. Are six-month checks adequate? And when should surgery be considered? (Locked) More »

Testosterone replacement: A cautionary tale

Testosterone therapy has been viewed as a way to counter the effects of aging where bone calcium declines, muscle mass decreases, body fat increases and red blood cell counts decline. But there is no proof that testosterone therapy will reverse these changes and its safety for older men remains controversial. A study found that men who took daily testosterone had a higher incidence of cardiovascular events. Its role in prostate disease, both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer is unresolved. (Locked) More »

That nagging cough

A persistent or chronic cough that lasts longer than a few weeks can be worrisome, but for nonsmokers, the most common causes include asthma, bronchitis, post nasal drip, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and medication for high blood pressure. Before you attempt to diagnose and treat yourself, review these red flags that call for prompt medical attention. More »

Marriage and men's health

Statistics on marriage and health show that married men are healthier than unmarried or divorced men, and are also more likely to live longer. However, marital stress has a negative effect on physical and mental health. Marriage positively affects a men's survival rate for specific diseases, including America's leading killers, cardiovascular disease and cancer.  More »

Testosterone and the heart

Testosterone has been linked to cardiac risk factors like peripheral artery disease (PAD). The most serious long-term complications of testosterone therapy include an increased risk of prostate diseases, both BPH and possibly prostate cancer. But researchers are beginning to examine the possibility that testosterone therapy might be beneficial for men with heart disease. Do the benefits outway the risks? More »

What to do about hemorrhoids

Many people experience the discomfort of hemorrhoids. Often they can be treated effectively with topical products and by eating more fiber. If they persist, surgical options are available. More »

GERD: Heartburn and more

Millions of people suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Lifestyle changes such as avoiding certain foods can help control symptoms, and there are also several effective medications available. More »