Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

Medical memo: Semen quality and survival

How healthy are you, and how does your life expectancy stack up against the average? To answer these questions, your doctor will ask about your smoking, drinking, diet, and exercise. He'll measure your cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, and weight or waist size. And he may ask if you're happy or stressed and if you sleep well. These facts and numbers do count; men who rate well in midlife stay healthier and live longer than gents who score poorly. Still, scientists are always looking for additional measurements that predict survival. And research from Denmark proposes an unlikely candidate: semen quality. More »

Pot for the prostate?

Marijuana raises complex legal, social, and economic issues that overshadow the considerable medical controversies. Scientists are studying various cannabinoids, chemical compounds derived from the plant itself. Research from Spain raises the possibility that certain cannabinoids may someday have a role in managing prostate cancer. (Locked) More »

Is sex exercise? And is it hard on the heart?

As many men get older, they wonder if sex is a good form of exercise or if it's too strenuous for the heart. These questions may sound like locker room banter, but they are actually quite important — and they now have solid scientific answers. More »

Medical memo: Cholesterol and prostate cancer

Ask men about their top health worries, and most will put cholesterol and prostate cancer high on the list. That's understandable, since unfavorable cholesterol levels contribute to heart attack and stroke, the first and fourth leading causes of death in America, and prostate cancer takes about 32,000 lives a year. Still, while most men understand the link between cholesterol and cardiovascular disease, few suspect a link between cholesterol and cancer. Research is beginning to change that. (Locked) More »

Acupuncture for ED?

Research is beginning to consider the possibility that acupuncture may help some men with erectile dysfunction. Acupuncture merits more study, both in relation to ED and to a host of other purported uses.  Men who are attracted to "all-natural" therapies should work on lifestyle changes that can preserve or improve erectile function. (Locked) More »

Two-way street between erection problems and heart disease

Trouble getting or keeping an erection can be an early warning sign of heart disease, much as heart disease can signal a man's current or future sexual problems. Instance of either should prompt a conversation with your doctor about the other, as well as lifestyle choices that can improve sexual function and cardiovascular health. (Locked) More »

Bladder cancer: Men at risk

One of the unappreciated benefits of growing older is that cancer of the testicles becomes rare — but as men outgrow that risk, they face the problem of prostate cancer. With these well-publicized diseases to head their worry list, it's easy for men to overlook bladder cancer — but that would be a mistake. More »

Never too late: Exercise helps late starters

Results of studies from several countries, including the United States, confirm that men who do not start exercising until middle age still gain many health benefits from it, most importantly added longevity. Men who start exercising after age 50 need to exercise caution.  (Locked) More »

Obesity: Unhealthy and unmanly

Excess body fat raises levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol and triglycerides while also lowering HDL ("good") cholesterol levels. Obesity impairs the body's responsiveness to insulin, raising blood sugar and insulin levels. Obesity increases the risk of male maladies, ranging from erectile dysfunction to BPH and prostate cancer. It also increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, gallstones, cancer, osteoarthritis, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver, and depression. Obesity and lack of exercise are responsible for about 1,000 American deaths each day, and if present trends continue, they will soon overtake smoking as the leading preventable causes of death in the U.S. More »