Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

European PSA testing trial update offers little guidance to American men

The latest results from the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) found a lower risk of death due to prostate cancer in men screened using the PSA test, compared to men who were not screened. But unfortunately this finding does not offer clear guidance to American men trying to figure out what the great PSA testing debate means for them. (Locked) More »

How to beat the post-saw palmetto blues

Many men have tried saw palmetto in hopes of relieving bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms, such as waking repeatedly in the middle of the night to use the bathroom. But the latest and best clinical trial data have left doctors far less likely to suggest a trial run of the herbal remedy. (Locked) More »

BPH (hypertrophy vs. hyperplasia)

As a 78-year-old man with an enlarged prostate, I'm particularly interested in your fine articles about BPH. But if memory serves me right, we called the condition "benign prostatic hypertrophy" when I was in practice, but now you call it "benign prostatic hyperplasia." What's the difference? (Locked) More »

Light smoking: Dangerous in any dose

Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. The health hazards of tobacco are enormous; they include heart attack, stroke, dementia, aortic aneurysms, emphysema, asthma and lung infections, and cancers of the mouth, throat, lung, and many other organs. Is smoking "just a little bit" harmful? A study from the University of California, San Francisco shows that light and intermittent smoking is nearly as dangerous as heavy smoking. Smoking just one to four cigarettes a day triples the risk of developing lung cancer; less than 10 cigarettes a day does the same thing for heart disease. More »

Epididymitis

  I am a 73-year-old man and I've been diagnosed with epididymitis, which has been quite painful - to say the least. I would appreciate your comments about the cause, cure, and any other implications of having this problem.   (Locked) More »

The PSA test: What's right for you?

The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is the most important issue in men's health and most controversial. PSA believers and doubters have awaited the results of randomized clinical trials to resolve the debate. The USPSTF  based its 2011 recommendation statement on such trials. This article takes a look at the four major trials released between 2009 and 2011. Ultimately, the decision whether or not to have the test depends on an individual's risk factors and overall health. More »

The new PSA report: Understand the controversy

United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) latest recommendation on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing points out that before a man decides whether or not to have the test, he should fully understand that screening for early prostate cancer may do more harm than good. Any man who is considering getting a PSA test needs to understand both the positive and negative implications of the test. More »