Men's Health

The average man pays less attention to his health than the average woman. Compared to women, men are more likely to

  • drink alcohol and use tobacco
  • make risky choices
  • not see a doctor for regular checkups

Men are assailed by the diseases that can affect anyone—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, depression… But they also have unique issues such as prostate cancer and benign prostate enlargement.

Many of the major health risks that men face can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle: regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking, stress reduction, and alcohol consumption in the moderate range (no more than two drinks a day) if at all. Regular checkups and screening tests can spot disease early, when it is easiest to treat.

So don't be an average man — get on board with protecting your health today.

Men's Health Articles

How much weight loss is cause for concern?

It is normal to lose some weight as a person ages. In fact, an estimated 10% to 20% of men older than age 65 lose 5% or more of their body weight over the rest of their lifetime. However, losing 5% of total weight in one year or 10% over two years warrants some medical testing. (Locked) More »

A new look at testosterone therapy

Millions of older men have turned to testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) to restore hormone levels in hopes of refueling depleted energy and reigniting their sex drive. While TRT remains controversial because of its potential health risks, it can be a viable option for a subgroup of men who meet specific criteria.  More »

Concern about recurring hiccups

Hiccups are often caused by many everyday situations, including distention of the stomach (which can be the result of overeating), swallowing air, or drinking carbonated beverages. They usually go away on their own, but episodes that last longer than 48 hours could be a sign of certain medical problems.  (Locked) More »

Moderate and intense exercise may slow brain aging by 10 years

Another reason to turn up the exercise intensity: It may keep your brain young. An observational study published online March 23, 2016 in Neurology examined 876 people, average age 71, who were enrolled in the Northern Manhattan Study. The participants were asked how long and often they exercised prior to the study. Approximately 90% reported either no exercise or light exercise, such as walking and yoga; 10% did higher intensity activities like running and aerobics. An average of seven years later, each person was given a brain MRI and tests on memory and thinking skills. The tests were repeated five years after that. More »

Should you take “senior” multivitamins?

There is little scientific proof that multivitamins or special “senior” vitamin formulas helps you live longer, feel better, or avoid disease. Spending money on fresh fruits and vegetables is a wiser and healthier investment. (Locked) More »

Sunscreen confusion

Even if men are aware of the dangers of sun exposure, new research shows most do not follow basic guidelines. Proper use of sunscreen and sun protection can help older men avoid being among the one in five who will get skin cancer during his lifetime.  (Locked) More »

Turn away from neck pain

Approximately 80% of people experience neck pain during their lifetime, and 20% to 50% deal with it annually. Besides the obvious physical discomfort, neck pain can trigger headaches and cause numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arms, and may be linked to medical problems, including rheumatoid arthritis or infection. Making certain lifestyle changes can keep your neck strong, healthy, and pain-free.  (Locked) More »

The heart attack gender gap

Men face a greater risk of heart disease than women and develop the disease at younger ages. Higher rates of unhealthy habits (such as smoking) may be partly to blame. But women have lower survival rates after a heart attack, perhaps because they are more likely to dismiss heart attack symptoms and delay seeking treatment. Women may also be less likely to receive beneficial medications and advice when they leave the hospital after a heart attack.  (Locked) More »