Heart Health

The heart beats about 2.5 billion times over the average lifetime, pushing millions of gallons of blood to every part of the body. This steady flow carries with it oxygen, fuel, hormones, other compounds, and a host of essential cells. It also whisks away the waste products of metabolism. When the heart stops, essential functions fail, some almost instantly.

Given the heart's never-ending workload, it's a wonder it performs so well, for so long, for so many people. But it can also fail, brought down by a poor diet and lack of exercise, smoking, infection, unlucky genes, and more.

A key problem is atherosclerosis. This is the accumulation of pockets of cholesterol-rich gunk inside the arteries. These pockets, called plaque, can limit blood flow through arteries that nourish the heart — the coronary arteries — and other arteries throughout the body. When a plaque breaks apart, it can cause a heart attack or stroke.

Although many people develop some form of cardiovascular disease (a catch-all term for all of the diseases affecting the heart and blood vessels) as they get older, it isn't inevitable. A healthy lifestyle, especially when started at a young age, goes a long way to preventing cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes and medications can nip heart-harming trends, like high blood pressure or high cholesterol, in the bud before they cause damage. And a variety of medications, operations, and devices can help support the heart if damage occurs.

Heart Health Articles

Chest pain: A heart attack or something else?

Chest pain is an indicator of a possible heart attack, but it may also be a symptom of another condition or problem. Chest pain isn't something to shrug off until tomorrow. It also isn't something to diagnose at home. If you are worried about pain or discomfort in your chest, upper back, left arm, or jaw; or suddenly faint or develop a cold sweat, nausea, or vomiting, call 911 or your local emergency number to summon an emergency medical crew. It will whisk you to the hospital in a vehicle full of equipment that can start the diagnosis and keep you stable if your heart really is in trouble. More »

Exercise stress test

An exercise stress test is a good — but not great — indicator of the health of the heart and coronary arteries. It works quite well for people who are likely to have cholesterol-clogged arteries and who can exercise long enough to reach their maximum heart rate. The test isn't as good for people at low risk of heart disease, or those who are too frail or out of shape to exercise long enough. More »

Testosterone and the heart

Testosterone has been linked to cardiac risk factors like peripheral artery disease (PAD). The most serious long-term complications of testosterone therapy include an increased risk of prostate diseases, both BPH and possibly prostate cancer. But researchers are beginning to examine the possibility that testosterone therapy might be beneficial for men with heart disease. Do the benefits outway the risks? More »

Premature heart disease

  Coronary artery disease is the biggest cause of heart attacks in younger men, but other causes include defective arteries, clot disorders, and drug abuse.   More »

Sporadic high blood pressure deserves attention

Monitoring your blood pressure by taking daily readings at home over a period of time can provide a more accurate sense of your true pressure than a reading in the doctor's office, which may be artificially high or low. More »