Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Daily "dose" of white rice linked to diabetes

White rice is a staple food in some parts of the world, especially Asian cultures. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health evaluated whether the tasty grain is served with a side of risk for Type 2 diabetes. (Locked) More »

Everyday foods are top sources of sodium

Everyday foods like bread, cold cuts, pizza, and poultry were the four leading sources of sodium in the American diet in 2007–2008, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (Locked) More »

Food for thought

The pillars of the Mediterranean diet—lean protein (especially fish), leafy green vegetables, whole grains and legumes, nuts, antioxidant-rich fruit, monounsaturated oils such as olive oil, and moderate alcohol consumption. This nutritional lineup has long been heralded as the gold standard for heart-healthy eating. Evidence is mounting that it's good for your brain as well. (Locked) More »

Sugar and your heart: Sour news about sweets

It's clear that America has a sweet tooth, and new evidence suggests that sugar is bad for the heart. Although the culprits are simple sugars, their relationship to cardiovascular disease is not so simple, since it depends on cardiac risk factors. (Locked) More »