Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Grain of the month: Buckwheat

Buckwheat is a pyramid-shaped seed that’s used like a grain and featured in different forms in cuisines around the world. Buckwheat contains substances that may help improve blood vessel health and lower cholesterol. More »

Low-carb and high-fat diet helps obese older adults

Science continues to explore what is the right percentage of carbohydrates and fat in people’s diets. But for obese older adults who need to lose fat and improve their health, a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet could be the best formula. More »

Obesity is still on the rise among American adults

American adults are gaining weight, according to data from the CDC. The prevalence of obesity is still on the rise, and in 12 U.S. states, 35% of the population is now obese, compared with just six states in 2017 and nine states in 2018. More »

Tips to cheat safely on your healthy diet

Eating an unhealthy meal every now and then may not cause problems for generally healthy people. This may mean eating a healthy diet 90% of the time and splurging 10% of the time. It’s called the 90-10 rule. But the rule shouldn’t be abused. Cheating regularly on a healthy diet can lead to weight gain and other consequences of poor eating habits. Instead, one should follow a healthy diet on most days, and indulge only occasionally. More »

Moderate amounts of coffee are the best

Drinking no more than four or five 8-ounce cups of coffee per day—equal to about 400 milligrams of caffeine—helps people get the drink’s health benefits with a lower risk of caffeine side effects like anxiety and nervousness. More »

Seed of the month: Pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin seeds are one of the best natural sources of magnesium, a mineral that’s important for keeping blood pressure in check. They’re also a good source of several other minerals, unsaturated fats, and fiber. More »

The new-old way to treat gout

The American College of Rheumatology recently released updated guidelines on how to best treat gout and prevent future flare-ups. They included first-line treatments like anti-inflammatory medications and ice therapy. A combination of diet and lifestyle changes and medications (including urate lowering therapy, or ULT) —is typically recommended if attacks recur or become chronic. (Locked) More »