Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Can the keto diet help me lose weight?

The keto diet is a popular and effective way to lose weight in the short term. But it’s very high fat and protein and low carb requirement can be tough to maintain and may present some health risks. More »

Legume of the month: Pinto beans

In some countries, pinto beans are cooked with epazote, an herb that purportedly helps reduce beans’ flatulence-producing properties. Gradually adding beans to the diet and eating them regularly may also help avoid that problem. (Locked) More »

Skip vitamins, focus on lifestyle to avoid dementia

New guidelines released May 19, 2019, by the World Health Organization recommend a healthy lifestyle—such as keeping weight under control and getting lots of exercise—in order to delay the onset of dementia or slow its progression. More »

Is your liver at risk?

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common condition that can lead to serious problems. Risk factors for the condition include obesity, diabetes., high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. While many Americans have the condition, it can be reversed sometimes by making simple lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, exercising more, and reducing sugar intake. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Mung beans

Many Asian cuisines use olive-green mung beans in soups, curries, and savory pancakes. Americans may be more familiar with slender, white mung bean sprouts, which are used in Chinese and Thai stir-fries. More »

New thinking on daily food goals

Dietary guidelines have shifted away from daily food goals measured in servings. Instead, they now focus on daily food totals that are measured in cups, ounces, or tablespoons. The daily goals depend on one’s health, sex, and age. For example, for moderately active adults ages 66 or older, men are advised to eat 2,200 calories per day; women are advised to eat 1,800 calories per day. Daily food goals for those diets include 2.5 to 3 cups of vegetables, 1.5 to 2 cups of fruit, and 6 to 7 ounces of whole grains. More »

The larger role of micronutrients

Many older men don’t get enough micronutrients from their diet. These vitamins and minerals are needed to support heart health, keep bones strong, and improve the immune system, among other health benefits. Adopting a plant-based diet that features abundant amounts of multicolored foods and trying different styles of cuisines can help people get enough variety in their diet to ensure they receive adequate amounts of vital micronutrients. (Locked) More »