Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Can the keto diet help me lose weight?

The keto diet is a popular and effective way to lose weight in the short term. But it’s very high fat and protein and low carb requirement can be tough to maintain and may present some health risks. More »

Counting on calories

Men ages 50 and older need anywhere from 2,000 to 2,800 calories per day. The exact amount, however, depends on many individual factors, such as age, weight, height, metabolism, and most important, activity level. Focusing on quality of food instead of quantity by embracing a diet that includes whole grains, nuts, fish, and fruits and vegetables can provide the necessary calories along with the vitamins and other micronutrients men need for an active and healthy life. (Locked) More »

Legume of the month: Pinto beans

In some countries, pinto beans are cooked with epazote, an herb that purportedly helps reduce beans’ flatulence-producing properties. Gradually adding beans to the diet and eating them regularly may also help avoid that problem. (Locked) More »

Maximizing home food delivery

There are many options for home food delivery, such as grocery store delivery, restaurant food delivery, and subscription produce clubs. Most services require customers to place orders on a website or smartphone app. When restaurant food arrives, one should make sure it’s still warm, and eat it right away or put it into the refrigerator. If a person isn’t home to receive a delivery of food from the grocery store or from a produce club, food will be left outside, potentially allowing cold items to spoil. So one should try to be home when a delivery is expected. (Locked) More »

Salt sensitivity: Sorting out the science

Eating too much salt usually boosts blood pressure, but not in everyone. Some people are salt-sensitive while others are salt-resistant. The genetic basis of these differences involve a variety of mechanisms. Some genetic variants affect an enzyme called renin, which is secreted and stored in the kidneys. Others influence the production of aldosterone (a hormone that increases blood volume) or affect the transport of sodium and other minerals within the body. A better understanding of these variants may one day improve treatment of high blood pressure. (Locked) More »

Skip vitamins, focus on lifestyle to avoid dementia

New guidelines released May 19, 2019, by the World Health Organization recommend a healthy lifestyle—such as keeping weight under control and getting lots of exercise—in order to delay the onset of dementia or slow its progression. More »

Is your liver at risk?

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common condition that can lead to serious problems. Risk factors for the condition include obesity, diabetes., high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. While many Americans have the condition, it can be reversed sometimes by making simple lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, exercising more, and reducing sugar intake. (Locked) More »