Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Is it safe to eat fish?

Fish are considered an important part of a healthy diet. And even though fish may contain low levels of toxins or microplastics, doctors still advise eating fish at least twice a week. This is because the benefits of eating fish exceed the risks. Studies involving hundreds of thousands of people over decades have found that people who eat one or two 3-ounce servings of fish per week have a nearly 40% reduction in death from heart disease—the No. 1 cause of death in the United States and other developed nations. (Locked) More »

The high cost of a poor diet

What people choose to eat has a big impact on their cardiovascular health. The dietary habits of the nation as a whole also have a major effect on the country’s economic health. About 45% of the costs associated with heart disease, stroke, and diabetes is related to unhealthy diets. The dietary habits that appear to have the biggest effect are not eating enough nuts, seeds, and seafood omega-3 fatty acids. Among foods to avoid, sugary beverages and processed meats seem to contribute the most to higher costs. Each year, unhealthy diets cost the United States an average of about $300 per person in medical costs, which translates to $50 billion nationwide. (Locked) More »

5 foods to eat to help your heart

While the focus is often on avoiding unhealthy foods, adding in nutritious options can be a means of protecting and improving your heart health. Olive oil, mixed nuts, multicolored fruits and vegetables, fatty fish, and sources of soluble fiber are options to try. (Locked) More »

5 steps to long-lasting independent living

Older adults who want to continue to live independently need to focus on five areas of their health that can ensure their continued well-being and, ultimately, the preservation of their lifestyle. These five areas are staying mentally engaged, being active, sleeping well, eating right, and being current with health exams. (Locked) More »

Are artificial sweeteners healthy?

People may consume artificial sweeteners to help with weight loss or to avoid weight gain. Yet research has found that these sugar substitutes could have the opposite effect and promote weight gain. (Locked) More »

Understanding acute and chronic inflammation

Inflammation plays an essential role in healing and injury repair and is an integral part of the way a person’s immune system keeps the body safe and healthy. Some inflammation is good. Too much is often harmful. The goal is to recognize when inflammation is merely doing its job, and when it can potentially cause problems. More »