Healthy Eating

A healthy diet helps pave the way to a healthy heart and blood vessels, strong bones and muscles, a sharp mind, and so much more.

Confused about what constitutes a healthy diet? You aren't alone. Over the years, what seemed to be flip flops from medical research combined with the flood of diet books and diet plans based on little or no science have muddied the water. But a consensus has emerged about the basics, which are really pretty simple.

An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

Eat more of these foods: fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish and seafood, vegetable oils, beans, nuts, and seeds.

Eat less of these foods: whole milk and other full-fat dairy foods, red meat, processed meats, highly refined and processed grains and sugars, and sugary drinks.

Healthy Eating Articles

Confused about carbs?

Low-carb diets, which swap carbohydrates for protein or fat, have been popular off and on for decades. The long-term cardiovascular effects remain unclear, but the source and amount of proteins and fats (in addition to carbs) also play a role. Diets that include more animal-based protein and fats (such as beef, lamb, pork, chicken, and cheese) instead of carbohydrates have been linked to a greater risk of early death. In contrast, diets that include more plant-based proteins and fats (from vegetables, legumes, and nuts) have been linked to a lower risk. (Locked) More »

Vegetable of the month: Broccoli

A versatile vegetable, broccoli keeps well and can be cooked many different ways, in soups, stir-fries, pastas, and casseroles. It’s high in several vitamins and is a good source of potassium and fiber. More »

Don’t let winter put a chill on your vegetable intake

American women are falling short when it comes to eating the recommended daily amount of vegetables, according to the CDC. Fewer vegetable options and higher prices may make it even less likely that women will get enough during the winter months. Strategies such as trying new varieties and buying frozen vegetables can help women get the recommended amount. (Locked) More »

What to order at the coffee shop

More coffee shops are ditching prepackaged pastries and sandwiches and offering fresh, gourmet food. But some of it comes with whopping amounts of fat, salt, carbohydrates, or sugar, just like any restaurant food. When ordering, one should not focus so much on nutrition details such as carbohydrate and fat counts, and instead make a choice based on the food displays or descriptions. If a food has refined grains (white bread, tortillas, noodles), processed meat (bacon, sausage, ham), or too much cheese, butter, cream, or sugar (like all pastries), it’s not a good choice. (Locked) More »