Feet & Foot Care

Feet & Foot Care Articles

Calluses and corns

Calluses and corns are thickenings of the outer layer of skin. They develop to protect skin from damage against prolonged rubbing, pressure, and other forms of irritation. Calluses and corns usually form on the hands or feet. They only need treatment by a doctor or other clinician only if they cause pain or other problems.  More »

Heel pain explained

Plantar fasciitis usually gets better without medical treatment. Stretching and weight training can speed the process. (Locked) More »

Bunions and bunionettes

Bunions are among the most common causes of painful toes. A bunion is a misalignment of the bones in the foot. This occurs when something causes the big toe to turn inward, bending toward (or even under) the other toes. The medical term for bunion—hallux valgus deformity—is a literal description of the condition. "Hallux" is Latin for big toe, "valgus" is Latin for misalignment. A bunionette is a similar condition that affects the base of the baby toe. It is sometimes called a "tailor's bunion," because tailors once sat cross-legged all day, with the outer sides of their feet rubbing on the ground. Bunions plague more than half of all American women, and a quarter of men. They are twice as common among people over age 60, compared with younger adults. More »

Hammertoe

The smallest four toes of each foot have three bony segments connected by two joints. Hammertoe is a deformity in which one or more of the small toes develops a bend at the joint between the first and second segments. The tip of the toe turns downward, making it look like a hammer or claw. The second toe is the one most often affected. Hammertoe may be more likely to occur when the second toe is longer than the first toe or when the arch of the foot is flat. Most hammertoes are caused by wearing ill-fitting, tight or high-heeled shoes over a long period of time. Shoes that don't fit well can crowd the toes, putting pressure on the middle toes and causing them to curl downward. Other causes include: More »

Achilles tendonitis

Your Achilles tendon connects your calf muscles to your heel. It is the largest tendon in the body. It is also the strongest, withstanding great force each time you raise your body's weight on your toes, such as when you walk, run, jump, or stand on your toes to reach something. Achilles tendonitis (sometimes spelled tendinitis) is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon. Without treatment, this condition can become a long-term problem, increasing the chances of breaking (rupturing) the Achilles tendon. Achilles tendonitis is usually caused by overuse. It is common in runners and other athletes. Sometimes it is a sign of a body-wide joint condition such as ankylosing spondylitis. Wearing poorly fitting shoes, or wearing high heels every day, can also cause Achilles tendonitis. More »

Ankle problems

The ankle is a vulnerable structure. It connects the ends of your two lower leg bones to your foot. Sitting at this intersection, it is subject to plenty of wear and tear. Sprains and breaks are the most common types of ankle problem. A sprain is a stretched or torn ligament, tendon, or muscle. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint in the body. A sprained ankle usually occurs when you roll over onto the outside of your foot, placing the full weight of your body on the ligaments supporting the ankle. Symptoms vary in intensity depending on the severity of the injury. They include pain, tenderness, redness, bruising, swelling, or loss of mobility of the ankle. If you think you have sprained your ankle, apply RICE therapy: More »

Foot and ankle health IQ

Feet are vulnerable to a number of common problems. The toes may suffer from a Morton’s neuroma, a bunion, or hammertoe. Two problems dog the toenails: ingrown toenails and toenail fungus. The biggest cause of heel pain is a condition called plantar fasciitis. Pain that strikes behind the ankle may be caused by a tight Achilles’ tendon, resulting in tendinitis. A fallen arch is also painful. This occurs when the main tendon in the foot loses its elasticity. Metatarsal bones in the middle of the feet are prone to fractures in people with osteoporosis. (Locked) More »

Better shoes help you walk away from a common cause of heel pain

Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of heel pain. This intensely painful condition affects the tough, fibrous band of connective tissue (fascia) on the bottom of the foot. The pain comes from the spot where the band attaches to the heel bone. Healing from a flare-up can take months, but in the meantime basic self-help steps can relieve the pain and inflammation. Wearing shoes that support the arches of the feet is important to prevent or relieve heel pain from plantar fasciitis. For cases that do not get better on their own, doctors can offer a range of therapies that help most people recover, but they don’t work for everyone. (Locked) More »

Quick fixes for your aching feet

Colder weather often brings foot problems to light because people again wear closed shoes instead of sandals. Common problems include fallen arches, pain in the back of the heel known as Achilles tendinitis, pinched nerves in the foot, ingrown toenails, and pain underneath the heel known as plantar fasciitis. When these conditions occur, it is best to get to a doctor as soon as possible, to keep it from getting worse. In many cases, there are quick fixes for each problem. (Locked) More »