Exercise & Fitness

Exercising regularly, every day if possible, is the single most important thing you can do for your health. In the short term, exercise helps to control appetite, boost mood, and improve sleep. In the long term, it reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, depression, and many cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following:

For adults of all ages

  • At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking or 75 minutes of rigorous exercise like running (or an equivalent mix of both) every week.  It’s fine to break up exercise into smaller sessions as long as each one lasts at least 10 minutes.
  • Strength-training that works all major muscle groups—legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms—at least two days a week.  Strength training may involve lifting weights, using resistance bands, or exercises like push-ups and sit-ups, in which your body weight furnishes the resistance.

For pregnant women

The guidelines for aerobic exercise are considered safe for most pregnant women. The CDC makes no recommendation for strength training. It’s a good idea to review your exercise plan with your doctor.

For children

At least 60 minutes of physical activity a day, most of which should be devoted to aerobic exercise. Children should do vigorous exercise and strength training, such as push-ups or gymnastics, on at least three days every week.

Exercise & Fitness Articles

Free services to help your health

There are many free services that can help improve health. Grocery store workers can point shoppers toward fruits and vegetables that are in season and the freshest cuts of meat. Pharmacists may be able to dispense free prescription medications or free advice about how to use medications, and even take a person’s blood pressure at no charge. Some universities offer free online academic classes. Some nonprofit organizations provide free food to people who are too sick to shop or cook for themselves. And many organizations offer free exercise classes for older adults. (Locked) More »

Have the secrets to exercise success in the palm of your hand!

You can access Starting To Exercise on your smart phone, tablet, or desktop computer. With easy log-in and simple-to-navigate screens, this online course is designed for adults of all ages. In a NEW online course, STARTING TO EXERCISE, today's leading fitness instructors show you workouts that work...the exercises that will help you enjoy a healthier, more vigorous, and longer life! It's a fact: regular, vigorous exercise can add more than three years to your life! Exercise lessens your risk of heart disease and stroke. It lowers blood pressure, reduces risk of certain cancers, strengthens bones, protects joints, and keeps your mind sharp. More »

10 tips to get you exercising regularly

The challenges of balancing the demands of family, work, and other responsibilities can make it difficult can make exercise a low priority, but it's important to stay as healthy as possible to enable you to meet all those challenges. It's possible to find time for your fitness goals by changing your thinking and behavior. (Locked) More »

Lift weights to boost muscle

Men naturally lose muscle mass as they age—as much as 3% to 5% per decade after age 30. Weaker muscles mean less stamina, balance and mobility, all which increase a person’s risk for falls and fractures. Strength training, using either free weights like dumbbells, kettlebells, and barbells or weight machines that are designed to work specific muscle groups, can help men maintain and even add muscle. More »

Can I still run after a hip replacement?

Hip replacements can wear out over time and require a revision surgery, so activities that may increase stress on the joint are often discouraged. The right level of activity after a hip replacement depends on the person and is best discussed with a doctor. More »

Is your workout giving you a stiff neck?

When people do not use the proper form during physical activity, they may experience neck pain. Common mistakes include extending the neck forward when swinging a golf club, looking up while doing a “downward dog” position in yoga, and leaning too far over bicycle handlebars. Tucking your chin back toward the neck helps keep the neck in a neutral position and may help reduce pain. Strengthening the neck, shoulder, and core muscles also helps prevent neck pain. More »