Exercise & Fitness

Exercising regularly, every day if possible, is the single most important thing you can do for your health. In the short term, exercise helps to control appetite, boost mood, and improve sleep. In the long term, it reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, depression, and many cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following:

For adults of all ages

  • At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking or 75 minutes of rigorous exercise like running (or an equivalent mix of both) every week.  It’s fine to break up exercise into smaller sessions as long as each one lasts at least 10 minutes.
  • Strength-training that works all major muscle groups—legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms—at least two days a week.  Strength training may involve lifting weights, using resistance bands, or exercises like push-ups and sit-ups, in which your body weight furnishes the resistance.

For pregnant women

The guidelines for aerobic exercise are considered safe for most pregnant women. The CDC makes no recommendation for strength training. It’s a good idea to review your exercise plan with your doctor.

For children

At least 60 minutes of physical activity a day, most of which should be devoted to aerobic exercise. Children should do vigorous exercise and strength training, such as push-ups or gymnastics, on at least three days every week.

Exercise & Fitness Articles

How to banish aches and pains

Regularly engaging in a variety of physical activity can help to relieve and prevent everyday aches and pain in the muscles and joints. For longstanding, chronic musculoskeletal pain, it can help to see a physical therapist to carefully evaluate the causes and recommend appropriate and safe stretches. A regular stretching routine, such as yoga, aids flexibility, strength, and range of motion in joints. Being too sedentary can lead to problems like tight hamstring muscles in the back of the leg, which can contribute to lower back pain. (Locked) More »

Injuries are up among older cyclists

The number of injuries and hospital admissions among older bicycle riders has made a startling jump. This may be because of an increase in older bike riders, more street accidents, and sport cycling. More »

Punch up your exercise routine with fitness boxing

Fitness boxing is a popular physical activity for older adults. There are two main types of these exercise classes. In one, participants follow a leader and do a series of boxing moves choreographed to bouncy music, similar to an aerobics class. In the other, participants may hit a punching bag, stretch, and strength train. Both types of classes are available for people who wish to remain seated while punching at the air or at a punching bag. Fitness boxing is a great aerobic activity. It also helps improve muscle strength, endurance, balance, and possibly eye-hand coordination. More »

Exercise: A promising treatment for dementia?

New evidence presented at the July 2015 Alzheimer's Association International Conference suggest that aerobic exercise may be able to protect the brain from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, and improve quality of life if people have the disease. More »

Rising blood sugar: How to turn it around

High blood sugar (glucose) is an early warning sign of diabetes. It also suggests a need to lose weight and exercise more. Men should have their glucose tested periodically. Once every three years is sufficient for men not at high risk of diabetes. (Locked) More »

The journey toward heart disease

Years of toil against high blood pressure, clogged arteries, and obesity erode the heart's capacity to pump effectively. However, engaging in positive lifestyle habits at any age can delay the onset of heart failure symptoms. (Locked) More »