Exercise & Fitness

Exercising regularly, every day if possible, is the single most important thing you can do for your health. In the short term, exercise helps to control appetite, boost mood, and improve sleep. In the long term, it reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, dementia, depression, and many cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following:

For adults of all ages

  • At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise like brisk walking or 75 minutes of rigorous exercise like running (or an equivalent mix of both) every week.  It’s fine to break up exercise into smaller sessions as long as each one lasts at least 10 minutes.
  • Strength-training that works all major muscle groups—legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms—at least two days a week.  Strength training may involve lifting weights, using resistance bands, or exercises like push-ups and sit-ups, in which your body weight furnishes the resistance.

For pregnant women

The guidelines for aerobic exercise are considered safe for most pregnant women. The CDC makes no recommendation for strength training. It’s a good idea to review your exercise plan with your doctor.

For children

At least 60 minutes of physical activity a day, most of which should be devoted to aerobic exercise. Children should do vigorous exercise and strength training, such as push-ups or gymnastics, on at least three days every week.

Exercise & Fitness Articles

5 tools to help you stand up on your own

Some tools can help people stand up from a seated position. For example, a “couch cane” provides additional support to get up off of a couch. A car grab bar slips into a door latch and acts as an extra support to lean on when exiting or entering a car. Rotating seat cushions help a person swing the legs into standing position. And furniture risers raise the height of a seat, which may also assist someone when standing. The ultimate assistance in getting up from a chair is an automatic electric recliner. More »

Harnessing the power of high-intensity interval training

Interval training means adding brief bouts of strenuous exercise to a workout. Compared with moderate-intensity exercise, it not only saves time but may also help people lose weight and improve their heart health. Also known as high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, the practice may help people burn calories at a high rate after they stop exercising. It also seems to be especially effective in improving the body’s ability to use oxygen, known as cardiorespiratory fitness. (Locked) More »

4 stretches to keep your shoulders in shape

An easy way to stave off shoulder problems is to regularly stretch the muscles that support the joints. Stretching the muscles fixes the shortening that occurs with disuse and extends muscles to their full length. The more one stretches the muscles, the longer and more flexible they’ll become. That will help increase range of motion, ward off pain, reduce the risk for injury, and improve your posture. In order to stretch the muscles, one should warm up the muscles and then hold stretches without moving for 30 seconds to two minutes. More »

Join the resistance

Giant rubber bands known as resistance bands are versatile and inexpensive equipment that should be part of every man’s exercise toolbox. They offer a greater range of resistance compared with dumbbells, can be adjusted to meet certain physical limitations, support injury recovery, and help improve power movements needed for everyday living. (Locked) More »

Skip vitamins, focus on lifestyle to avoid dementia

New guidelines released May 19, 2019, by the World Health Organization recommend a healthy lifestyle—such as keeping weight under control and getting lots of exercise—in order to delay the onset of dementia or slow its progression. More »

Winning the weight battle after menopause

Changes in hormone levels just before and during menopause may cause women to gain weight and to store more weight around their middle, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle changes can help, but they may not always be enough to make a difference. Some women may need to seek out assistance from a weight-loss professional. (Locked) More »

Is your liver at risk?

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common condition that can lead to serious problems. Risk factors for the condition include obesity, diabetes., high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. While many Americans have the condition, it can be reversed sometimes by making simple lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, exercising more, and reducing sugar intake. (Locked) More »