Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

Can you make up for years of poor eating?

Atherosclerosis (clogging of the arteries) may be reversible through intensive lifestyle changes, but because the process is highly challenging, experts say it’s preferable to focus on preventing new damage to avoid a cardiovascular crisis, such as a heart attack or stroke. More »

Deterring heart disease if you have diabetes

Three newer medications for type 2 diabetes, empagliflozin (Jardiance), canagliflozin (Invokana) and liraglutide (Victoza), appear to lower the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease in addition to lowering blood sugar. Empagliflozin and canagliflozin, which improve diabetes by helping the body release more sugar into the urine, seem to be especially helpful for decreasing heart failure cases. Liraglutide lowers blood sugar by preventing the liver from making too much sugar and helping the pancreas produce more insulin. It reduced serious heart events by 13% and deaths from heart disease by 22%. People with type 2 diabetes and heart disease who are having trouble reaching their HbA1c targets may want to discuss these new medications with their doctors. (Locked) More »

Insider tips to maximize your doctor visit

The average length of a doctor visit ranges from 10 to 20 minutes. There are ways to maximize every moment. For example, it helps to prepare and prioritize questions for the doctor in advance, and tell the doctor as soon as possible that there are questions that need to be answered before the end of the visit. When the doctor asks about the reason for the visit, one should give a brief summary. (Locked) More »

What’s new with the shingles vaccine

Shingrix, a new vaccine to protect against the shingles virus, reduces the risk of shingles by an average of 97% among adults ages 50 and older. This is almost double the protection of the previous shingles vaccine, Zostavax, which reduces the risk of shingles by an average of 51%, but becomes less effective as people age. (Locked) More »

Ask these questions when you get a new prescription

When a doctor prescribes a new medication, it’s essential to ask questions about it. The patient should find out why the medication is needed, how it works, what the risks and benefits are, what side effects might occur, how to take the medication, what to avoid when using the medication, how soon the medication will begin working, and when it will be time to re-evaluate if the medication is still necessary. (Locked) More »