Drugs & Medications

Drugs & Medications Articles

An eye on glaucoma drugs

Glaucoma is a disease in which the eye does not drain fluid well. This can increase eye pressure, which damages the eye’s optic nerve and can lead to vision loss and blindness. Once glaucoma is diagnosed, treatment requires daily eye drop medication to slow or stop its progression. Four types of drugs and combinations of them are currently used, but two new drugs have been introduced that can benefit a subset of patients who need extra help to reduce eye pressure by improving fluid drainage. (Locked) More »

Anticholinergic drugs linked with dementia

Anticholinergic medications used to treat bladder conditions, Parkinson’s disease, and depression are associated with an increased risk of dementia, suggests a new study. People who got dementia had taken the medications for between four and 20 years, and the longer they took the drugs, the greater the risk. More »

Are drugstore sleep aids safe?

An occasional night of sleeplessness may warrant the use of an over-the-counter sleep medication or a sleep-promoting dietary supplement. Sleep medications that are available over the counter use antihistamines as their main active ingredient. They are generally safe, but there aren’t a lot of data about their long-term use. Dietary supplements that may promote sleep include chamomile, melatonin, and valerian root. There aren’t a lot of data about the safety and effectiveness of chamomile and valerian root. Melatonin can be taken safely for the long term. It is meant to shift the timing of one’s sleep cycle. (Locked) More »

Getting the most out of your heart medications

Medications used to treat cardiovascular disease can help prevent life-threatening events, so people should make sure they’re taking them correctly. Understanding the reasons behind specific prescribing instructions may help. Examples include finding the best the timing for blood pressure medications, taking medications with food, and avoiding or minimizing alcohol use while taking certain medications. (Locked) More »

Stay safe from superbugs

Superbugs are bacteria that have developed immunity to some or all antibiotics used to treat infections. Most often people will be infected with superbugs only in a hospital setting. But the risk of infection with a superbug can be reduced by washing hands regularly, reducing antibiotic use when possible, and asking questions about infection-control procedures in a hospital setting. (Locked) More »

Avoiding heart problems in your 80s

Advancing age may warrant changes to preventive therapies for heart disease. For example, most people in their 80s may do better with systolic blood pressure readings closer to 140 mm Hg or above, rather than 120 mm Hg. The decision to take statins and aspirin depends on a person’s history of heart disease and other risk factors. But a person’s degree of frailty—a syndrome marked by slowness, weakness, fatigue, and often weight loss—may be even more relevant than actual age when making medication decisions. (Locked) More »

How atrial fibrillation may affect your brain

People with atrial fibrillation—a heart rhythm disorder that causes a rapid, irregular heart rate—may face an increase risk of thinking and memory problems. Atrial fibrillation causes blood to pool in the heart’s upper left chamber, which may form clots that can travel to the brain, causing a stroke. But tiny clots can cause silent, unnoticed strokes. Over time, these stroke gradually injure part of the brain involved with thinking and memory. (Locked) More »

Treatments for opioid medication addictions

Dr. Wynne Armand talks with Dr. Terry Schraeder about the increase in opiod addictions and shares prevention and treatment methods for those experiencing an addiction to prescription opioid medication. More »