Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

Did my diet cause my gout?

Diet alone is unlikely to cause a type of painful arthritis known as gout, but can trigger an attack in someone who already has the condition. (Locked) More »

Over-the-counter hearing aids: Are they ready yet?

While over-the-counter hearing aids aren’t yet approved by the FDA, the devices are already in existence and are currently called "personal sound amplification products," or PSAPs. They’re intended for people with perceived mild or moderate hearing loss. But not all PSAPs are the same. Experts recommend finding a PSAP that has easy-to-use controls and apps, customer service with advice about operating the devices, and a money-back guarantee with a 60-day return window. The devices should have several microphones, noise cancellation, and the ability to be customized to an individual’s needs. (Locked) More »

What can I do for my excessive sweating?

Excessive sweating commonly happens in stressful social situations. But it may be underlying anxiety that is causing the problem. Topical antiperspirants and medications to reduce anxiety if needed can help reduce excessive sweating. (Locked) More »

Should I get a COVID-19 antibody test?

A test for COVID-19 antibodies, which shows past infection, can be helpful in the rare situation of a person who has COVID like symptoms but a persistent negative nasal swab test. Also it may help diagnose people who have long-term symptoms post COVID, known as "long COVID." (Locked) More »

What to expect after COVID

COVID-19 may have lingering effects, such as headaches, fatigue, and cognitive problems, and possibly lung, heart, or kidney damage. Because so little is known about why this happens, there are no official follow-up guidelines or recommendations. Some experts say it may be worth a conversation with a doctor. It is hoped that research may yield more information in the future. (Locked) More »