Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

Top 4 reasons why you're not sleeping through the night

There are many potential contributors to disrupted sleep in older age. Age can be a factor, but shouldn’t be assumed as the cause. Lifestyle habits often lead to interrupted sleep. Examples include drinking alcohol within four hours of bedtime, napping too much during the day, and consuming too much caffeine. Medication side effects can sometimes cause nighttime waking. So can underlying conditions, such as anxiety, chronic pain, or sleep apnea. Changing one’s lifestyle and treating an underlying condition can help improve sleep, as can practicing good sleep hygiene. More »

Battling the big toe joint blues

The joint at the base of the big toe is called the metatarsophalangeal or MTP joint. Common conditions that affect the MTP joint include osteoarthritis, the wearing away of cartilage between the bones; bunions, a condition in which the first metatarsal bone juts outward, causing the phalanx bone to point inward toward the other toes; and gout, a type of inflammatory arthritis. Surgery is always a last resort for bunions or MTP arthritis. Gout may require over-the-counter painkillers or prescription medications. (Locked) More »

Feeling the burn? Antacids can provide some relief

Over-the-counter antacids may be effective at managing occasional bouts of heartburn. But persistent heartburn should be checked out by a doctor, who may want to prescribe medication or look for underlying medical causes. (Locked) More »

Feeling woozy when you stand?

Orthostatic hypotension is a temporary drop in blood pressure when standing. The condition reduces blood flow to the brain, causing lightheadedness, blurred vision, or fainting. Some people don’t have any symptoms, and don’t discover they have orthostatic hypotension until they fall. Treatment can involve compression stockings, elevating the head of the bed at night, a high-salt diet, and medication. Getting up from a bed or chair slowly and drinking lots of fluids to prevent dehydration can also help manage the condition. (Locked) More »

Nothing to sneeze at

Older adults can develop seasonal allergies—also known as hay fever, even if they never had them before. The best ways to help avoid allergy symptoms and manage their severity is to track the daily pollen count, use certain over-the-counter medication as needed, and potentially take allergy vaccines to build up resistance to specific allergens. More »

Should I worry about a twitching eyelid?

Eyelid twitching often occurs after physical and emotional stress. While it’s not a serious problem, applying a warm compress to the eyelid or gently massaging around the area provides quick relief. (Locked) More »

What is ALS?

ALS stands for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a terminal disease of the nerve cells that are involved in signaling muscles to move. Two medicines can slow but not stop the progression of the disease. (Locked) More »