Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.


Diseases & Conditions Articles

Are sunstroke and heatstroke the same?

Heatstroke (or sunstroke), a life-threatening condition, happens when the body can no longer maintain a temperature under 105° F. People should drink plenty of fluids when outside in hot temperatures and watch for symptoms like thirst, weakness, and nausea. (Locked) More »

Be alert to an increasingly common threat: tick-borne illnesses

Ticks are an increasingly common source of illness, especially in the summer months. While these illnesses used to be common only in certain areas of the country, today more people across the United States are at risk. These conditions typically produce nonspecific symptoms, such as fever, headache, and joint pain, and are treated using antibiotics. More »

Fatty liver disease: An often-silent condition linked to heart disease

As many as one in four Americans has a potentially dangerous accumulation of fat in the liver. Known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, it is closely linked to obesity and diabetes and may boost heart disease risk. The milder form of the disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), can progress to a more serious condition called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), in which the liver cells are inflamed and injured. The plant-focused Mediterranean diet, which helps prevent heart disease, may slow the progression of fatty liver disease. Other key lifestyle changes include weight loss and regular aerobic exercise. (Locked) More »

Poor sense of smell may predict risk of death in older adults

Shorter term studies have suggested a link between loss of smell among older adults and risk of death. A new report confirms that the association between loss of smell and earlier death persists over more than a decade and identifies the leading causes: cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. More »

Closing in on tinnitus treatments

Tinnitus is a ringing in the ears that occurs with age. It may be triggered by impaired hearing, leading to diminished sound impulses moving along the auditory nerve between the ear and the brain. In some people, the brain tries to compensate for this loss of input by turning up internal volume and tuning into background sounds in the brain. Tinnitus can be difficult to treat. There’s no way to measure it directly, which is needed for diagnosis and effective treatment. Researchers are working to identify a physical signature for tinnitus by using measurements of the pupils and brain activity. More »

Is your liver at risk?

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a common condition that can lead to serious problems. Risk factors for the condition include obesity, diabetes., high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. While many Americans have the condition, it can be reversed sometimes by making simple lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, exercising more, and reducing sugar intake. (Locked) More »

Look out for Lyme

Summer is prime time for Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. Common symptoms include a rash at the site of the tick bite, fever, chills, fatigue, and muscle and joint aches. People can protect themselves by properly treating their clothes before going outside, doing thorough body checks afterward, and removing attached ticks. Antibiotics such as doxycycline are very effective at killing the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. (Locked) More »

Shortness of breath: A common symptom with many possible causes

Shortness of breath can result from a range of problems, but heart or lung conditions are usually to blame. Sudden breathing problems may be a heart attack or pulmonary embolism, which require immediate attention. Breathing problems that come on more gradually and during physical activity may be caused by aortic stenosis or heart failure. Worsening breathing problems with coughing may be chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which often coexists with heart disease. (Locked) More »

Why do I have a salty taste in my mouth?

The most common causes of a salty taste in the mouth are side effects from medication and dehydration. Besides increasing daily water intake, people should review their medications with their doctor or pharmacist. (Locked) More »