Diseases & Conditions

The human body is a remarkable structure. It's designed to efficiently manage the wear and tear of everyday life and fend off all sorts of threats. Most of us are healthy for most of our lives. But we're also susceptible to hundreds of injuries, diseases, and conditions. Some are quite common, others are extremely rare. Here are some of the most common conditions that affect humans.

Diseases & Conditions Articles

Can cycling cause erectile dysfunction?

Cycling is a great low-impact exercise, which is ideal for many older men. But can putting in miles in the saddle cause temporary erectile difficulties? It depends. According to a Harvard Special Health Report, Erectile Dysfunction: How medication, lifestyle changes, and other therapies can help you conquer this vexing problem, the Massachusetts Male Aging Study found that in certain circumstances, bike riding can damage nerves and compress arteries in the penis, which may lead to erectile problems. The risk was highest among men who cycled more than three hours a week. The reason cycling may cause ED is that the seat puts constant pressure on the perineum—the area between the genitals and anus. This pressure can harm nerves and temporarily slow blood flow, which causes tingling or numbness in the penis and, eventually, ED. More »

What’s that constant headache pain in the temples?

Throbbing pain in the temples, especially on just one side of your head, is typically a symptom of migraine pain. But when throbbing turns into a constant headache, and it's accompanied by pain when you touch your temples, it may be a sign of temporal arteritis, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Headache Relief. Temporal arteritis causes and symptoms More »

Sexually transmitted disease? At my age?

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are on the rise in people of all ages. There were more than two million reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis in 2016, with significant increases in cases among middle-aged and older adults. For example, among people ages 55 to 64, reports of chlamydia cases nearly doubled between 2012 and 2016, from 4,950 to 9,321. The most common types of STDs include genital herpes, human papillomavirus, chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus. (Locked) More »

What’s new with the shingles vaccine

Shingrix, a new vaccine to protect against the shingles virus, reduces the risk of shingles by an average of 97% among adults ages 50 and older. This is almost double the protection of the previous shingles vaccine, Zostavax, which reduces the risk of shingles by an average of 51%, but becomes less effective as people age. (Locked) More »

Is that winter sniffle a cold or a sinus infection?

There are two primary ways to differentiate a cold from a sinus infection. One is duration: cold symptoms traditionally begin to improve after three to five days; sinus infection symptoms tend to last longer than 10 days without improving. Another telltale sign is if a cold starts to improve after a few days, but suddenly rebounds and becomes worse. That’s called double worsening and suggests that what began as a cold has turned into a bacterial sinus infection. (Locked) More »

Is there a way to treat seborrheic keratosis?

Seborrheic keratoses are raised, rough lesions that appear typically on the trunk, back, face, or neck after age 50. They are not cancerous or contagious, and there is no way to prevent them or stop them from returning once removed. (Locked) More »

The skinny on fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, is a dangerous and often difficult to detect condition. The disease affects up to 25% of American adults, 60% of whom are men, and raises a person’s risk of heart disease and diabetes. However, adopting a proper exercise routine and making dietary changes can reduce a person’s risk, and, in someone diagnosed with the disease, even reverse its effects. (Locked) More »