Diabetes

Diabetes occurs when the body has trouble using the sugar it gets from food for energy. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar can have immediate effects, like blurry vision. It can also cause problems over time, like heart disease and blindness.

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile-onset diabetes) and type 2 diabetes (once called adult-onset diabetes). Both are caused by problems making or using insulin, a hormone that makes it possible for cells to use glucose, also known as blood sugar, for energy.

When you eat, your body breaks down carbohydrates into a simple sugar called glucose. It also produces a hormone called insulin that signals the body's cells to absorb glucose from the bloodstream. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin, or stops making it altogether. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body's cells don't respond to insulin. Either way, since sugar can't get into cells, it builds up in the bloodstream. 

Too much sugar in the blood can cause a range of uncomfortable symptoms. These include:

  • blurry vision
  • intense thirst
  • need to urinate often
  • fatigue
  • numbness or tingling in the hands or feet

Type 1 diabetes often comes on suddenly. It usually strikes children and teenagers, but can appear later in life. It is an autoimmune disease, meaning it happens because the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the body's insulin-making cells. Type 1 diabetes can't be cured, but it can be managed by taking insulin before eating.

Type 2 diabetes takes longer to develop. It can begin any time from childhood onward. Type 2 diabetes is usually triggered by being overweight or obese and not getting much physical activity. Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes weight loss if needed, daily exercise, a healthy diet, and medications.

Diabetes Articles

How often should you get your blood sugar checked?

People who have diabetes risk factors should get their blood sugar checked. If it’s normal, they should get it checked again in three years. If it’s not normal, they should get it checked yearly. Risk factors include being older than 45, being overweight (with a body mass index of 25 or higher), a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of type 2 diabetes, a history of high blood pressure or high cholesterol, or a heritage that is African American, Hispanic, American Indian, or Asian American. (Locked) More »

Ask the doctor: Statins and the risk of diabetes

Statins may raise blood sugar levels in a small number of people, possibly triggering a diagnosis of diabetes. But the overall benefit of statins in treating heart disease outweighs any slight increase in the risk of diabetes.  (Locked) More »

Weight-loss surgery for uncontrolled diabetes

People with obesity and uncontrolled diabetes who underwent weight loss surgery lost much more weight, had better blood sugar control, and used fewer diabetes medications than people treated with medications alone.  (Locked) More »

The diabetes-heart disease connection and what it means for you

High blood sugar and other diabetes-related problems harm the heart in several major ways. There are now many ways to control the disease and reduce heart risk. In addition to lifestyle changes that benefit both diseases, there are new and effective medications available to control blood sugar.   (Locked) More »