Coronavirus and COVID-19

Coronavirus and COVID-19 Articles

5 factors to help you gauge where COVID-19 risk is highest

To get an idea where COVID-19 risks are highest, one should consider if an environment has poor airflow, crowds, and low use of face masks. The amount of time spent somewhere and the ability to sanitize the hands should also be considered. The more risk factors that are present, the higher the risk. For example, spending an hour in a crowded, stuffy gym with low face mask use is a bad idea; it’s better to go for a walk and lift dumbbells at home. (Locked) More »

Should I get a flu shot this year?

This year, getting a flu shot is more important than ever, because it can not only protect people against the flu, but will also reduce the burden on health care systems. (Locked) More »

Coronavirus outbreak and kids

Children's lives have been turned upside down by this pandemic. Between schools being closed and playdates being cancelled, children's routines are anything but routine. Kids also have questions about coronavirus, and benefit from age-appropriate answers that don't fuel the flame of anxiety. It also helps to discuss — and role model —  things they can control, like hand washing, social distancing, and other health-promoting behaviors. How does COVID-19 affect children? (Locked) More »

Are you denying yourself medical care?

Fears of catching COVID-19 may be keeping some people from seeking medical treatment. But many doctor appointments, such as those for medication management, can be handled via telemedicine. Appointments that must be conducted in person—such as dental visits and cancer screenings—can in some cases be postponed, if a doctor says it’s okay; it depends on a person’s individual health. No one should avoid treatment for an urgent medical condition, such as a suspected heart attack or stroke. (Locked) More »

COVID-19 and flu season: What to expect

Doctors are very concerned about how the COVID-19 pandemic and the approaching flu season will affect high-risk people. Experts stress that getting a flu vaccine and continuing to follow behavioral changes introduced during the COVID pandemic, such as mask wearing, hand washing, and physical distancing, can offer effective protection against the flu. (Locked) More »

Vaccination update

As scientists race to find a vaccine to ward off SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, doctors are reminding people to get other scheduled vaccinations. Older adults are advised to get their scheduled shots to protect against flu, shingles, pneumonia, and other infectious diseases. The benefits of vaccines may go beyond immunity to the germs they introduce; vaccines may help keep the immune system stay "fit" and give people a boost when they encounter other bugs. (Locked) More »

5 tips to help you stay healthy this winter

To stay healthy this winter, people should stick to tried-and-true infection-control strategies, such as handwashing, following a healthy lifestyle, having regular medical check-ups, and getting a flu shot and other recommended vaccines. This year, wearing a mask and avoiding large gatherings is also important. New products marketed to kill germs may be ineffective; the best cleaning strategy is to wipe surfaces clean, and then use a simple disinfectant. (Locked) More »

COVID-19 or something else?

Many COVID-19 symptoms—such as fever, cough, or muscle aches—overlap with the symptoms of other respiratory conditions, such as influenza, a common cold, or asthma. But there are differences among the conditions. For example, a bout of the flu or a cold will not cause shortness of breath the way COVID-19 will. And while asthma can cause shortness of breath, it won’t cause a fever or body aches the way COVID-19 will. A person who’s experiencing concerning symptoms of respiratory illness should report them to a doctor. More »

Why can’t we develop COVID-19 treatments faster?

It will take time to find a medication to treat COVID-19. Doctors must learn how the virus that causes COVID-19 is built, since the virus might have a weak spot that can be attacked. Scientists must also determine how the virus attaches to and then enters into a person’s cells, and how it multiplies once it’s inside the cells—so they can create or find a drug that blocks those steps. Doctors will also have to test a potential treatment on a large number of people to see if it works and causes side effects. (Locked) More »

Will there be a COVID-19 vaccine?

There are many different ways to produce a vaccine. All are being tried simultaneously in the effort to fight COVID-19. Vaccines typically include a killed or weakened virus, or a protein from the virus. When the vaccine enters the body, the immune system "sees" and remembers it. Then, if the real virus enters the body later in life, the primed immune system attacks and eradicates it. Growing the large amounts of virus needed for a vaccine, or making the virus’s proteins in a laboratory, takes a lot of time and money. So, faster and cheaper approaches have been developed. (Locked) More »