Cancer

Cancer is the catchall term applied to diseases caused by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Cancer isn't one disease. It is many different diseases, more than 100 and counting.

Each kind of cancer is usually named for the cell type in which it begins — cancer that starts in a lung is called lung cancer; cancer that starts in pigment cells in the skin, which are known as melanocytes, is called melanoma.

When detected and treated early, cancer can often be stopped. That said, cancer is a leading cause of death and disability around the world.

Cancer Articles

Do you know the symptoms of women's cancers?

Many women are not familiar with the symptoms of cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar cancer. Cervical cancer is the only gynecologic cancer with a screening test (Pap test). It’s important for women to be aware of symptoms such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain or pressure, abdominal pain, and bloating, and to report these symptoms to their gynecologist or primary care provider. (Locked) More »

Best way to prevent advanced colon cancer

A colonoscopy can help prevent the diagnosis of late-stage colon cancer. Research suggests that the test can reduce the likelihood of advanced colorectal cancer diagnosis by 70% in adults with average risk. (Locked) More »

Caution: Cancer risk elevated in women with dense breasts

The risk of dying from breast cancer does not appear to be greater in women with dense breasts who get breast cancer. That may be because women with breast cancer often are treated with medicines that lower estrogen levels and block the effects of estrogen. Women with dense breasts are advised to get a breast MRI in addition to a mammogram if they have a known hereditary cancer gene, a first-degree relative with the mutation, a history of radiation to the chest wall in adolescence, or a 20% to 25% or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer based on family history and other risks. (Locked) More »

An option for low-risk prostate cancer

After prostate cancer diagnosis, many men choose immediate treatment with surgery or radiation. But immediate treatment is not the only option. Some men with early low-risk prostate cancers can choose to hold off on the decision to treat until the disease presents a greater threat. At that later date, the cancer can still be treated effectively. The approach is called active surveillance with delayed intention to treat. Bothersome and potentially permanent side effects of treatment include erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. By choosing active surveillance, some men can avoid the risks of treating a cancer that may be unlikely to cause them serious harm within their lifespan. (Locked) More »