Bladder & Bowel

Bladder & Bowel Articles

Cystoscopy

Cystoscopy is a procedure that allows doctors to look inside the bladder and the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder. A cystoscope is a tube-like instrument with lenses, a camera and a light on one end and an eyepiece on the other. With a cystoscope, your doctor can examine the urethra and the lining of the bladder. If necessary, your doctor can pass surgical instruments through the cystoscope to perform specific procedures. In most cases, a simple cystoscopy lasts 5 to 10 minutes. Procedures that are more complex take longer. Cystoscopy checks inside the bladder for tumors, sites of bleeding, signs of infection, stones (calculi) and causes of bladder outlet obstruction. It also can be used to: Your doctor will review your medical and surgical histories, current medications and history of allergies. If you may be pregnant, tell your doctor before the procedure. (Locked) More »

How can I prevent recurrent UTIs?

Preventing frequent urinary tract infections can become more challenging as women age, but drinking lots of water and practicing good hygiene can help prevent them. (Locked) More »

Pill-free treatment for urinary incontinence

A study published online March 18, 2019, by Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that behavioral therapy is more effective than medication or neuromodulation for stress incontinence and urge incontinence. More »

Tips for better bowel control

Stool can leak out of the rectum accidentally—a condition called fecal incontinence—as a result of aging, an underlying condition, or damage to nerves or muscles. A fiber supplement such as Metamucil or Citrucel can help reduce incidents of loose stool leakage. An over-the-counter antidiarrheal medication such as loperamide (Imodium) can also help. A surgical procedure called sacral nerve stimulation can help curb solid stool incontinence. Pelvic floor exercises can also help reduce leakages, but won’t solve the problem. More »

Why do I get weak after a bowel movement?

Bowel movements can slow heart rate and lower blood pressure, which can make a person feel weak. This often is not a serious problem, and lying down for a few minutes can make the feeling go away. More »

Problems with your pelvic floor? Blame your firstborn

While cesarean delivery may mean longer recovery time after your baby is born, it may make it less likely that someday you'll need to cross your legs when you cough or sneeze. A study in the Dec. 18, 2018, issue of JAMA found that women who delivered their first baby by cesarean had half the risk of developing stress urinary incontinence (which causes urine to leak when you cough or sneeze) or overactive bladder, compared with first-time moms who had a spontaneous vaginal birth. (Locked) More »

The growing problem of an enlarged prostate gland

By age 60, about half of all men will have an enlarged prostate. While the condition does not increase the risk of getting prostate cancer or having sexual problems, it can affect quality of life, specifically with annoying and embarrassing urination problems. Certain medications can help relieve symptoms, which means less urinary urgency and fewer nighttime awakenings to use the bathroom. More »