Alternative & Complementary Medicine

Alternative & Complementary Medicine Articles

Dietary supplements can be hard to swallow

A study found that 23,000 Americans visit the emergency room every year with bad reactions to dietary supplements, and that older people frequently report choking or difficulty swallowing vitamin and mineral supplements, especially those with calcium. More »

Boot camp for better sleep

Being worried about not being able to sleep can itself become the primary cause of insomnia. People with this problem begin to dread trying to sleep and develop negative feelings and beliefs about sleep. A counseling technique called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help. It is more effective than sleeping pills in the long term. Many insurance providers cover this service.  (Locked) More »

You can practice mindfulness in as little as 15 minutes a day

By Marlynn Wei, MD, JD, for more information on this study, see my blog post. In the research conducted by Dr. James E. Stahl and his team of Harvard researchers, study volunteers participated in an 8-week mind-body relaxation program offered through the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. The program taught a range of mind-body skills. More »

Could hypnotherapy help you?

Hypnotherapy is the use of hypnosis to treat any number of mental or physical health problems. Hypnosis turns your attention inward. Usually, you enter a trance-like state and, with the guidance of a hypnotherapist, you can start to control or alter your thoughts, feelings, and physical state.   (Locked) More »

When medications make you sensitive to sunlight

Sunlight can cause a reaction when a person is taking certain prescription drugs, such as some diuretics, antibiotics, antihistamines, anti-arrhythmics, antiseizure medicines, and antidepressants. These medications, known as photosensitizers, can make the skin especially sensitive to the sun’s radiation. Exposure to that radiation can cause overly reddened “sunburned” skin, hives, swelling, and itchy, scaly skin. When taking these mediations, it’s best to limit the amount of time spent out in the sun and wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. (Locked) More »

Cardiovascular consequences of hormone therapy

Hormone therapy after menopause does not shield women from heart disease and may slightly increase their risk of a stroke. Women who take hormones to treat menopause symptoms should use the lowest possible dose for a short time only. (Locked) More »