Aging

Children born today in the United States can expect to live nearly 78 years. That life expectancy is a great leap forward from 1900, when the average newborn couldn’t expect to reach age 50. Similar increases have been seen in in developed nations all around the world. In the 20th century, life expectancy increased more than it had in any century since the beginning of human civilization.

Life expectancy at various ages in teh United States

And the longer you live, the longer you can expect to live. Average life expectancy for a newborn American is 78 years, while it is 84 years for a 65-year-old and 87 years for a 75-year old.

But extending the lifespan has also increased the burden of diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, macular degeneration, and other conditions that tend to affect older individuals. Most of these diseases, though, aren't inevitable consequences of aging. Instead, many are preventable.

Solid research from long-term studies such as the Framingham Heart Study, the Nurses' Health Study, and others have shown that the combination of not smoking, eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and keeping blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar in check can prevent three-quarters or more of these chronic conditions.

Aging Articles

Fall prevention: What works?

Researchers have identified several effective fall prevention strategies, including home safety modifications, home-based exercise programs, tai chi, cataract surgery, changes to medication doses, and anti-slip shoes. (Locked) More »

Treating many conditions with just one pill

A polypill is a treatment that combines three, four, or more medicines into a single pill. It’s an idea that could make it easier to take medicines, and thereby prevent many women from missing essential medications. Studies conducted so far have found that a polypill combining a statin and blood pressure–lowering drugs effectively reduced LDL cholesterol and blood pressure. Researchers still need to establish the dose of each medicine in the polypill that will be safe and effective for the largest number of people. More »

Ask the doctor: How can I treat dry eyes?

Dry eye becomes more common with age, and it can cause corneal irritation or inflammation, which may even lead to vision changes. Eye drops can keep eyes moist, while avoiding irritants in the air can reduce the dry feeling. In some cases, surgery is needed to block the tear ducts. (Locked) More »

Avoid landing back in the hospital

Men are at a significantly higher risk of returning for urgent care within a month after being discharged from the hospital. It appears that men who are socially isolated—single, retired, and depressed—are more likely to return for urgent care. Doctors advise that both men and women should arrange for a caregiver to help at the time of hospital discharge and once at home to ensure adherence to a recovery regimen and physician follow-up. (Locked) More »

Hormone therapy: A new consensus

Fifteen medical organizations have jointly released a statement reinforcing the benefits of hormone therapy for menopause symptoms. The organizations jointly conclude that hormone therapy is still safe—provided that women take it early in menopause and use it for the shortest possible period of time.   (Locked) More »

Living alone linked to higher risk of cardiovascular death

  According to a new study, adults aged 45 to 79 with heart disease may die sooner if they live alone. For them, living alone may be a stressful psychosocial situation, whereas living alone at ages 80 or older may indicate independence and self-sufficiency.   (Locked) More »

Goodbye to yearly pap smears for some women over 65

If you're over 65, you may no longer need to see your clinician for a Pap smear every year, according to new cervical cancer screening recommendations from both the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Cancer Society. (Locked) More »

A possible brain food that you've probably never heard of

There's some research that lends some credence to claims that the nutrient Choline may be something of a "brain food" that fends off cognitive decline in old age. In the brain, choline speeds up the creation and release of acetylcholine, a protein that carries signals among brain cells and is important for memory and assorted other brain functions.  (Locked) More »