tick-borne infection

Matchless strategy for tick removal; 6 steps to avoid tick bites


Former Executive Editor, Harvard Health

What’s the best way to remove a tick burrowed into your skin? Don’t use one of the folk remedies, like touching it with a hot match, covering it with petroleum jelly or nail polish, or freezing it. These are all supposed to make the tick “back out” of the skin on its own. But they often have the opposite effect, forcing the tick to hold tight, burrow deeper, and possibly deposit more of its disease-carrying secretions into the wound, which increases the risk of infection. Instead, do what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend: Use a pair of fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible. Then pull it out with a steady motion. Once the tick has been removed, clean the skin with soap and water. Dispose of the tick, which is probably still alive, by placing it in alcohol or flushing it down the toilet. For most people who are bitten by a tick, removal ends the saga. For others, though, it is just beginning, since the bite of a tick can transmit Lyme or other tick-borne disease